Archive Article: 2002/06/14 - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

James Coggle – Fife

JAMES Coggle is sprayer operator on Denbrae Farms at Strathkiness by St Andrews.

He uses a Berthoud 1500-litre (330gal) mounted sprayer with 24m (78.7ft) booms and a 600-litre (132gal) front-mounted tank. The latter usually carries clean flushing water. That helps safeguard the high value broccoli, cauliflower and potato crops that are grown alongside the usual range of combinable crops on 599ha (1480 acres), including contract work.

Pollution prevention at filling is taken care of by having the water supply and chemical store side by side, with a weldmesh-topped half-barrel catch tray at working height. Packs are opened over this and the chemical measured out in safety and at a convenient height.

Application volumes range from 100 litres/ha for potato blight to 400 litres/ha for some calabrese sprays. On fields with a LERAP requirement the booms are fitted with 3-star nozzles that can be switched round on the 12m next to the restricted area.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Richard Ivett – Lincolnshire

RICHARD Ivett uses a Househam 2000-litre (440gal) self-propelled sprayer with 24m (80ft) booms on 155ha (383 acres) of combinable crops and sugar beet on Shillakes Farm, North Drove, near Spalding.

He keeps his work rate up by doing most of his spraying at 150 litres/ha and using a big bowser for water supply back at base, supported by a small nurse tank for outlying fields. Using XR-04 nozzles allows him to travel faster for 100-litre/ha applications.

A CTR attachment on the induction hopper allows many products to be filled through a close coupling. It also facilitates pack rinsing. The sprayer tank is triple rinsed in the crop by monitoring the volume for each rinse on the RDS. The booms are always cleared of spray mix before travelling on the road. Being on black soil, he follows a sulfonyl-urea spray on cereals with a tank load of manganese product to ensure good decontamination.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Combining peas, 60ha of Kabuki for seed, receive an Amistar (azoxystrobin)/Bravo (chlorothalonil)/manganese/pirimicarb spray mix at Proctor Bros Wingland Lighthouse Farm, Sutton Bridge, Lincs. Recent Syngenta work shows that a dual nozzle approach using 200litres/ha of water through a Twin Cap bayonet provides best coverage of Amistar, which worked well against botrytis and mycosphaerella in its first approval season last year, notes manager Adrian Howell. Target pea yields off the silty clay land are 5t/ha (2t/acre).

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Guessing game

Visitors to the SAS open day were invited to guess the cash value of a heap of farmyard manure. A £5 entrance fee contribution was suggested with proceeds going to the East Anglian Childrens Hospices, said SASs Andrew Melton. No one was quite sure what the winner would receive, or want to take home!

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Royal show… The Queen toured the three-day South of England show at Ardingly, West Sussex, last Friday (June 7) during the latest leg of her Jubilee tour. Although Patron of the South of England Agricultural Society it was the first time the Queen had visited the show since 1984.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

David Felce – Cambridgeshire

DAVID Felces 97ha (240-acre) Middle Grange LEAF Demon-stration farm at Southoe, near St Neots, has a Gem 2000-litre (440gal) demountable sprayer with 18m (59ft) boom on an MB-Trac.

This is being upgraded to a 20m Landquip so David can cope with an extra 186ha (460 acres) of spraying on a neighbours farm.

Davids skills have been honed by taking BASIS and FACTS qualifications and getting CPD points for the BASIS Professional Register. Environmental protection comes from a well thought out chemical store set close by a water supply bowser on a concrete pad, with an underground tank for collecting contaminated water. Another environmental aid comes from a secure insecticide carrier on the front of the tractor. That lets David add a barrier tank-mix in-field to speed up work and conserve predators in the rest of the field.

A stainless steel sink unit is used when opening and measuring products. Spills are retained and a wheeled half drum captures any drips, spillage or washings from sink or induction hopper. They are then returned to the spray mix.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Mark Lythe – Yorkshire

MARK Lythe is sprayer operator on the Albanwise Farm at Low Mowthorpe, near Malton.

He sprays 1214ha (3000 acres) of combinable crops and vining peas on the rolling Yorkshire fields. A 3000-litre (660gal) CASE self-propelled sprayer with 24m (80ft) booms applies liquid fertilisers as well as agrochemicals. To speed the work, much of it is done at 18kph (11.2mph).

With large areas and distances to cover Mark uses a fast fill from a borehole-fed water storage tank at base and a support bowser with lockable chemical compartment for distant fields. The chemicals are applied at 100 or 150 litres/ha with 300 litres/ha on peas. When spraying is over for the day, weather permitting, the empty packs are burnt in a CPA incinerator drum, otherwise they are stored securely until the weather improves.

The large potato enterprise centred on the farm means the sprayer is well protected in an insulated store after its winter service. This service is critical for trouble-free spraying and includes checking for pipe chaffing and a high-pressure test.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Will Butler – Hampshire

WILL Butler of Whitewool Farm, East Meon, near Petersfield, does the crop and liquid fertiliser spraying on 1011ha (2500 acres) of combinable spring and winter crops, plus 202ha (500 acres) of forage maize.

That means 10,117ha (25,000 acres) sprayed each year. A newly acquired 4200-litre (924gal) Hardi Commander 36m (118ft) boom trailed sprayer does this, and allows the tractor to be used on other mixed farm enterprises. Most spraying is at 100 litres/ha with 200 litres on OSR and maize, but drops to 70-80 litres for glyphosate.

A large container chemical store beside a gridded filling area over a sump and the close by water supply makes for efficiency and safety at filling. Each batch of chemical is loaded into an old feed trolley to transport it to the induction hopper.

A 600-litre (132gal) clean water tank allows in-field tank cleaning and outside jet washing with a 172bar (2500psi) fitted unit. A front mounted redundant calf box carries suction hoses and clean-up kit.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Nick Combes – Wiltshire

NICK Combes and his father farm 526ha (1300 acres) at Burcombe Manor, near Salisbury.

His 364 rolling arable hectares (900 acres) support combinable crops sprayed with a Knight demountable 24m, 2500-litre (550gal) sprayer carried on a JCB Fastrac. To speed the operation, nozzles are chosen to give 100 litres/ha at spray qualities to suit the product at speeds of 12.5-16kph (7.8-9.9mph) with only two products needing 150 litres/ha.

A newly constructed chemical store with unique bunding allows easy trolley access for wheeling a tank-load of chemical to a loading table on the concrete filling area. A 45,500-litre (10,000gal) water storage tank is fed from the estate water supply. And an underground catch tank intercepts contaminated water when filling, with a diverter valve channelling rainwater away when finished.

A Wisdom closed transfer unit is used when possible and a Ponyflow meter in the filling line has pinpointed a 56-litre inaccuracy in the sprayer sight gauge.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Silaging between the showers. David Kidd still has to cut two-thirds of the 36ha (90 acres) of silage grown on his family farm at Langwathby, near Penrith in Cumbria. "The rain is making travelling conditions a bit difficult," he says. With progress about one week behind, quality is beginning to suffer, although quantity is plentiful. The crop will be fed to the farms 70 dairy cows.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Powder value fear

Skimmed milk powder prices could slip again as EU sales into intervention reached the maximum ceiling allowed and Brussels moved to suspend the scheme.

Under normal trading arrangements, manufacturers are able to intervene up to 109,000t of SMP from when stores open in March until they close again at the end of August.

But world markets have been so depressed amd the scheme so popular that the allowance has already been used up.

As farmers weekly went to Press, the commission was planning to replace standard intervention at full support prices with a tender scheme. Officials were due to vote on the issue at yesterdays (Thursday) milk management committee meeting in Brussels.

Irish Farmers Association president John Dillon held crisis talks with EU officials at a farmers rally in Strasbourg this week. "Commissioner Franz Fischler must respond by strengthening EU dairy market supports, including open-ended intervention for SMP, increased export refunds and processing aids and higher EU intervention prices to put an effective floor under producer prices," he said.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Papillion, an imported three-year-old French Limousin bull, is doing his bit to help restock the Cumbrian Countryside, says Michael Holliday. Some of the 20-pedigree spring calving cattle at his Townhead Farm, near Penrith, have just started their breeding period. Fortunately, cattle are grazing on free-draining land allowing them to remain outdoors during recent wet conditions, he says.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

LIKE recent weather, grass growth on GrassWatch contributors farms has been variable over the past fortnight. Many are still adding to first cut silage stocks and unfavourable weather is proving a challenge.

Grass growth is low for the time of year at 50kg DM/ha on Richard Johns farm in Pembrokeshire. "Weather has been cold and wet, slowing grass growth. Our daily demand is 65kg DM/ha, so Ive turned cows on to a field, which was shut up for silage to avoid shortages later. This will increase average farm cover from 2000kg DM/ha to 2300kg DM/ha."

However, it is a different story in Shropshire, where Roly Tavernor is making extra silage to maintain grass quality. "Before shutting up some ground for silage we took two grazings, yet aftermaths have recovered for grazing within three weeks. We are aiming to keep covers at 2300kg DM/ha to maintain quality over the next couple of months."

Grass is also growing well in Cumbria on Robert Craigs farm. "We have been flat out making more silage than we intended. Covers are about 4000kg DM/ha. However, we may need this extra grass in July and August if there is a dry spell."

Delays to silage making are causing some concern for Wilts-based organic producer Christian Fox. "We hoped to cut silage two weeks ago, but weather has been too wet and we are still waiting to mow. We need aftermaths back in the rotation because drought is never far away." &#42

Daily growth rates

Cumbria 90kg DM/ha

Anglesey 70kg DM/ha

Staffs 70kg DM/ha

Pembrokeshire 50kg DM/ha

Shropshire 60kg DM/ha

Wilts (organic) 68kg DM/ha

Northern Ireland 77kg DM/ha

Berks 110kg DM/ha

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

David Rossiter with the second highest price Poll Dorset (850gns) at the Poll Dorset and Dorset Horn May Fair last week – the first pedigree ram and female sheep sale to take place this year. This ram lamb was bought by Fooks Bros, who sold the top priced Dorset Horn for 800gns. The highest bid of 1020gns went to W L and E Sandercock for a Poll Dorset shearling ram (see overleaf).

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

CORRECTION

SHEEP tagging should only take place on dry days, not Fridays as stated in last weeks ScotSheep 2002 report. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Take advantage of all the advice on offer

With farm incomes on the floor and crop prices lower than ever, it is tempting to batten down the hatches and ignore the outside world.

But this is the time to seize every ounce of advice to boost business prospects.

June is a month of crop demos, open days and trials site visits. Every event offers valuable advice, not just sales people eager to secure an order.

This week, the season got off to a flying start with Cereals 2002 in Lincs. Later this month Sprays and Sprayers near Cambridge and the Royal Northern Crop Event, near Aberdeen, offer further opportunities to capture the latest advice. So why not make the most of whats on offer?

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Fair income share will ease stress burden

News that farmers are stressed will surprise no one – the extent of that stress will shock everybody.

New research by Queens University, Belfast, shows that farmers feelings of hopelessness are double those of the population at large.

The reasons are obvious – long hours, a sense of isolation, cumbersome bureaucracy and financial insecurity. Some of those are an integral part of the job. But it is the consistent lack of profitability that is the most worrying. The report should serve as a warning to DEFRA secretary, Margaret Beckett, and those in Westminster who control the purse strings as to the likely consequences of their laid back approach to UK farming.

Action should be taken to ensure a fairer distribution of income along the food chain, before it is too late.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

A better test needed to cut cost of Johnes

New government advice on how to eradicate Johnes disease from the UK dairy herd is welcome indeed.

The disease costs infected herds at least £26 a cow every year.

But the proposed strategy will prove difficult to achieve without a reliable method for detecting infected cattle. Some test negative several times despite being infected, allowing the disease to spread unnoticed to other animals.

That casts doubt on the current strategy designed to control the disease. We need a new test – preferably one that is easy to use, such as a milk-based method. Then, perhaps we could expect to wipe out Johnes disease once and for all.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Environment schemes must have incentives

If politicians want producers to join agri-environment schemes they must make it worth their while.

And now could be a good time to assess what schemes could benefit your business in order to offset falling farm incomes.

But for environmental schemes to be effective, they should be performance related. After all, why should producers who do only the bare minimum receive the same as those who commit long hours, land and effort to improving the countryside? Without such incentives, why should producers bother?

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Strong rules are vital for organic credibility

Further fudging over standards for organic cereal production, this time in the form of seed origins, will do little for the industrys image.

The pragmatic EU derogation allowing organic growers to use conventional seed should be tightened when it runs out in Dec 2003. Failure to do so would invite accusations of rule bending.

If the credibility and profitability of organic production is to be maintained, it is high time Brussels strengthened the regulations governing this sector. Also organic seed distributors should be given proper statistics to help them judge the market more accurately.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Do you fancy yourself as a college wit?

Starting college this autumn? Then, how about writing for farmers weekly?

We are looking for a new contributor for our College Calendar series, the popular feature that focuses on two students who write a monthly update on college life.

This year, we have had warm and witty accounts of life at Bicton and Harper Adams. But we are looking for someone new this autumn. So, if you want to become FWs newest columnist, check out our Farmlife Section.

Just think – itll be a chance to earn some cash, see your words appear in your favourite magazine and, ultimately, be a fantastic addition for your CV.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Peter Delbridge

Peter Delbridge farms

162ha (400 acres) in the

Exmoor National Park, near

South Molton, Devon. The

farm is mostly permanent

grass, classed as less

favoured and environmentally

sensitive, and all above

300m (1000ft). It is

stocked with 800 ewes,

replacement ewe lambs, 60

spring calving sucklers and

their followers

RECENTLY we have been told to get closer to the consumer to receive a greater proportion of the retail price. Taking into account changes to the suckler cow premium scheme, allowing payment on 40% of heifers, I think it makes sense to finish as many as possible, even when this means cutting cow numbers.

As a trial, I kept five heifers back for finishing last autumn and they were slaughtered in mid-April.

In the past I have sold the odd lamb for the freezer to friends, so I thought I would try the same with beef. This is easier said than done. Firstly, a quarter or an eighth of a heifer seems quite daunting to the average housewife.

Secondly, many people assume we breed octopus x Limousin cattle, as everyone wants a hindquarter. We got around this by having it cut into mixed boxes of fore and hindquarters. Eventually, 10 customers were recruited and two heifers were delivered to a small family run abattoir in Ottery St Mary which allowed carcasses to hang for 17 days and made a top class job of cutting meat into 1.3-1.8kg joints, labelled and bagged.

When fixing a price, one must take into account costs. These include slaughter and butchery at £200/animal plus haulage and delivery. The Mitsubishi pick-up is a thirsty beast when whizzing around delivering within the three-hour deadline for non-refrigerated meat.

Was it worth the hassle? At times I wondered, particularly on the eve of delivery when a good friend let us down and withdrew her order. But when the beef was on the kitchen table, I must admit there was a similar pride to standing in the rostrum at Taunton.

When all costs were taken out, returns equalled a liveweight price of 118p/kg with slaughter premium to come. Interestingly, the three remaining heifers, 20kg heavier live, went to St Merryn and resulted in carcasses 30kg lighter, which makes me wonder whether their level of trim includes cutting a leg off first. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Alan Montgomery

Alan Montgomery runs

a 300ha (750-acre) mixed

farm near Downpatrick, Co

Down, Northern Ireland.

As well as cereals and

potatoes, the farm supports

a 130-cow suckler herd,

950 breeding ewes and

1000 store lambs

WITH the country gripped by Jubilee and World Cup fever, long lunches have been the order of the day.

Things will become interesting if England and Ireland make it to the knockout stages. Her Majesty on stage with Ozzie Osbourne emphasises how the monarchy has moved with the times.

Unfortunately, at farm level the past three weeks movement has been negative. High winds and 100mm (4in) of rain have severely disrupted spraying programmes. Potato planting has run into June and cattle were turned out to grass only to be rehoused.

Our sizeable silage carry over has been severely eroded. Mother Nature has indeed exacted revenge for favours given earlier in the year. Several dry sunny days are urgently required to dry out sodden pastures and raise the sugar content of silage swards, which we would like to ensile in June.

Given the conditions, lambs have thrived with sales well ahead of the same period last year. The first of the March-born lambs were sold at the start of the month.

Firmly committed to marketing through Strangford Down Ltd. We have been in discussion with our meat plant regarding this seasons lamb deal. Factories and liveweight centres are sourcing lambs at lighter weights. The maximum paid weight for grade 1 lambs – U or R2 and 3 – this season will be 21kg, a reduction of 1.5kg and 0.5kg, respectively. Fine in so far as we are continually reminded that retailers require lighter carcasses. However, our additional payments on grade 1 lambs have reduced by 5p/kg and 2p/kg, but penalties are less than previously for fat classes 4L and 5.

As a quality lamb group this deal is not in our best interests. A firm believer in the principal that if you want to receive you have to give, I am confident a more suitable arrangement will be attained.

Our 10.5ha (26 acre) swede area this year comes complete with a sea view. Before ploughing, 0.20.30 fertiliser was applied then power harrowed and rolled. Post-sowing it has been sprayed with 3 litres/ha glyphosate and 10 litres/ha Ramrod (propachlor). &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Sue & Andy Guy

Sue and Andy Guy farm

79ha (196 acres) on an

FBT in Notts. They are

expanding their 76-cow

pedigree high health status

Holstein herd which

averages 6900 litres

YOU know the feeling you get when you have reared a heifer calf from your best old cow. She was classified excellent and has done eight lactations without a hitch.

Now the genetics in the herd have moved on and, although you still value the old girl, she can no longer hold her own. The future of the herd rests with her heifer.

Of course she doesnt calve until Jul 1 and we wont know how she will perform until she has a chance to prove herself. Her pedigree is exciting and her PLI is up with the best of them.

We have the same feeling about The Milk Group. We have been passionate supporters ever since 1994 when the company started trading and we will be sorry to see it added to the culling list. Nonetheless, the future for our business lies with Dairy Farmers of Britain.

Hopefully, by the time this is published, both Zenith and the Milk Group members will have voted in favour of the merger and the new generation co-op will begin trading next month. This will be a step towards sorting out the fragmented industry and will mean we will generate the capital needed to expand into large scale, added value processing.

On the farm, we took first cut silage on May 10. The yield was about 17.25t/ha (7t/acre) which we are happy with. Rain has fallen since and soaked in the fertiliser, giving the second cut a good start.

Cows are enjoying the abundance of grass too. Milk recording last week delivered an average of more than 27 litres/head, two litres up on the previous month. The cows are in good condition and they are coming bulling on time. If they all hold to service as planned, we will be milking more than 100 next spring.

The dirty water irrigator which we mentioned a couple of months ago has irritated once too often and the new machine arrives soon. We opted for a rotating boom version instead of the rather complex hose reel design which has caused us so much stress last winter. Thats something that we are not sorry to put on the culling list. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Kate Oleszko is a 21-

year-old fourth year

degree student on an

Agriculture with Animal

Science course at Harper

Adams in Shropshire

THIS last fortnight has been a blur. Most of the country have been eating, sleeping, watching football or out at a street party for the Queens Jubilee. Ive been eating, sleeping and revising.

I dont think I ever really understood the word "cram" until now. We have had so many assignments and presentations to finish over the last few weeks that my head is still spinning. Yet now, as I write this, revision is even more important than those assignments.

Revision week was very steady as I sat at my desk and willed the information in front of me to stick in my head for the last time. Five more exams, and that would be it. This was the last time I would ever have to be revising. But, as always, I had the odd lapse of concentration and found distractions far more interesting!

Just like every other exam week, once it started exams flew by, one exam merging into another. As I entered my last exam, the end was in sight – not only would those last few hours frantically writing be over, but so would my four years at Harper.

As the exam finished, a smile came across many faces as we realised that this was it, we had finished our four years here, and we could begin our celebrations.

Although I was really glad that I had finished and that I would be moving on to pastures new, I was also sad. It was more a feeling that I would be leaving friends behind. But with four years of memories and hundreds of photos how could I ever forget you all.

So we all celebrated. We celebrated the end of college and the beginning of our futures. Who knows where we are all going to end up? Where we will be working? Living? And with who?

Good luck to anyone who is still sitting exams. Congratu-lations to all you fourth years: weve done it.

Roll on the Summer Ball for our biggest celebration yet. Its next week – on June 21 – which gives us seven days to party.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Dig this…past and present members of Bridgnorth Young Farmers Club enjoyed a trip to JCBs headquarters in Rocester, Staffords, recently. The trip included a tour of the manufacturing, construction and assembly plants.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Jim Powell – Northants

JIM Powell has recently moved to Fulford Farm, Culworth, near Oxford, and is responsible for spraying agrochemicals and liquid fertiliser on 477ha (1180 acres) of combinable crops using a Berthoud DP Tronic 3200-litre (704gal) 24m (80ft) trailed sprayer behind a Massey Ferguson 3120 tractor.

To speed filling, water is stored in a 14,000-litre (3080gal) insulated tank in the yard. This gravity fills two 6000-litre (1320gal) water containers carried in a twin-axle grain trailer for field support. The high capacity sprayer pump can fill at 400 litres (88gal) a minute, but the rate is slowed to 170 litres (37gal) while chemicals from the nearby chemical store are loaded in to the induction bowl, some of them through a CTR.

Almost all spraying is done at 100 litres/ha. Varying the nozzle choice at a spraying speed of 12kph (7.4mph), meets the required volume, crop and product needs, as well as LERAP requirements on a farm with the River Cherwell running through it. A complete dossier of information in the cab includes cropping, nozzle performance, hazards, Emergency Plan and a printout of the latest FWi weather information. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

WOULD you like to become a College Calendar contributor?

Well if youre starting college this autumn – and enjoy putting pen to paper – then you could because were looking for a new contributor. Itll be a chance to see your words (and photo) in farmers weekly, earn some cash and, lets face it, ultimately look great on your CV.

The series, introduced last year, sees two people share their experiences of college life. This year weve had warm and witty accounts of life at Bicton and Harper by Charlie King and Kate Oleszko. But Kates

graduating, so were now seeking her replacement. Could it be you?

You can be going to any college to study any subject. We just want someone who can write in an honest, informative and amusing way about student life.

So, if the idea appeals, write us 350 words called "College Expectations" Tell us what your hopes and fears are about starting college this autumn. It might touch on your expectations about your fellow students, the course work, the new environment, the social life. Anything, really.

The writer of the best one, as chosen by the judges, will be asked to write an article each month for the coming academic year – and paid £60 for each one. (Well also publish a

selection of the best "College Expectations" articles.)

Remember, were looking for someone who, starting this autumn, will be able to give an account each month for the next year of the highs and lows of their first year in further or higher education.

Entries must arrive by July 31 and, in addition to the 350 words, should include a few autobiographical details including how old you are, which college youre going to, what youre studying and why and what, if any, your farming connections are.

Send entries to: College Calendar Competition, Farmlife, farmers weekly, Quadrant House, The Quadrant, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS, or email tim.relf@rbi.co.uk

Students will also appear in farmers weeklys

Features section next week, when six teams

battle it out for the

coveted Farm Planner

of the Year title.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/06/14

14 June 2002

Bigger tractors with bigger boots has led Parkerfarm to introduce this new range of wide weighbridges. Manufactured in 3m and 3.2m widths, the weighbridges have tubular side rails, solid stainless steel load cells and new indicators with built-in agricultural software. The weighbridges come in 15m and 18m lengths with capacities of 60t. Prices start at £12,750.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus