22 November 1996

BATTLING TO KEEP TO QUOTA

FIVE Italian bulls currently in the countrys top 50 were bred at Del Santo Farm, Camairgo, Milan.

Of these five bulls the top three, including the current top Italian bull Corsaro, were bred from one cow in the 300-strong milking herd owned by the Arioli Brothers. This infamous Italian bull mother is Del Santo Mark Jamaica, a Chief Mark out of a Tony, which classifies VG 89. She gave 8445kg at 4.2% fat and 3.6% protein in her first lactation.

Her three sons are Del Santo Corsaro (see table p42) by Aerostar with an ILQM of 2339 and +2.13 on type, Del Santo Smith by Cleitus (ILQM 1766), and Del Santo Damasco by Leadman (ILQM 1986).

These bulls are now being used as sires across the herd – founded mainly on US and Canadian genetics – together with some progeny test semen, the Canadian bull Rudolph and the US bull Patron.

Angelo Arioli says that because top bulls are very expensive they are only used when flushing cows for embryo transfer. He is currently using Fatal and Lord Lilly as flushing sires.

Herd average yield is 9920kg at 3.7% fat and 3.34% protein. The highest indexing cow in the herd gave 12,000kg at 3.2% fat and 3.3% protein in her first lactation. But cow yields are restricted by quota. In the last quota year milk production was 5000 litres below quota, claims Mr Arioli.

"We must stay within quota. When quotas were introduced some large farmers found a way around it, but not now. Quota is good for the market as Italy produces 10-15% too much milk."

This year extra quota for the herd has been purchased at 30p a litre. The current milk price is 34p a litre.

However forage and grain production are key concerns on the 150ha (370-acre) farm, because purchased feed costs are 20% higher than last year.

The farm grows much of its own feed – only buying in soyabean meal, linseed, brewers grains, broken biscuits, minerals and vitamins.

Home-grown barley and high moisture maize grain or ground maize are also included in cow rations.

"High moisture corn is an excellent energy source at low cost," says Mr Arioli. "It also decreases milk fat so is good for quota."

The long growing season, warm climate and irrigation allow winter-sown barley to be harvested in mid-June so maize can be sown on these fields for silage.

Maize crops are irrigated two or three times with water from a local lake. A water pump is used for speed, but it is also possible to flood irrigate most fields.

Mixed grass and lucerne is made into large round bales of hay, with up to five cuts taken each year. Some fields of pure lucerne or ryegrass are also grown for hay.

Forage fields can also be irrigated but care must be taken when irrigating lucerne or it will not last over two or three years, adds Mr Arioli.

Later cuts of hay can be dried under cover where a fan is installed to blow air through floor ducts drying the bales that are stood on end. But fifth cuts are made into round bale silage.

Concentrates are mixed once a week and then added to forage each day in the self-loading feeder that Mr Arioli claims can chop every feedstuff.

The ration is 11kg of mixed concentrates and grain at 18-19% crude protein, 20kg maize silage, 5kg of mixed hay and lucerne hay, to give a 16% crude protein diet.

Cows are housed all year round because of flies in the summer. The buildings are sprayed to aid fly control. &#42


FIVE Italian bulls currently in the countrys top 50 were bred at Del Santo Farm, Camairgo, Milan.

Of these five bulls the top three, including the current top Italian bull Corsaro, were bred from one cow in the 300-strong milking herd owned by the Arioli Brothers. This infamous Italian bull mother is Del Santo Mark Jamaica, a Chief Mark out of a Tony, which classifies VG 89. She gave 8445kg at 4.2% fat and 3.6% protein in her first lactation.

Her three sons are Del Santo Corsaro (see table p42) by Aerostar with an ILQM of 2339 and +2.13 on type, Del Santo Smith by Cleitus (ILQM 1766), and Del Santo Damasco by Leadman (ILQM 1986).

These bulls are now being used as sires across the herd – founded mainly on US and Canadian genetics – together with some progeny test semen, the Canadian bull Rudolph and the US bull Patron.

Angelo Arioli says that because top bulls are very expensive they are only used when flushing cows for embryo transfer. He is currently using Fatal and Lord Lilly as flushing sires.

Herd average yield is 9920kg at 3.7% fat and 3.34% protein. The highest indexing cow in the herd gave 12,000kg at 3.2% fat and 3.3% protein in her first lactation. But cow yields are restricted by quota. In the last quota year milk production was 5000 litres below quota, claims Mr Arioli.

"We must stay within quota. When quotas were introduced some large farmers found a way around it, but not now. Quota is good for the market as Italy produces 10-15% too much milk."

This year extra quota for the herd has been purchased at 30p a litre. The current milk price is 34p a litre.

However forage and grain production are key concerns on the 150ha (370-acre) farm, because purchased feed costs are 20% higher than last year.

The farm grows much of its own feed – only buying in soyabean meal, linseed, brewers grains, broken biscuits, minerals and vitamins.

Home-grown barley and high moisture maize grain or ground maize are also included in cow rations.

"High moisture corn is an excellent energy source at low cost," says Mr Arioli. "It also decreases milk fat so is good for quota."

The long growing season, warm climate and irrigation allow winter-sown barley to be harvested in mid-June so maize can be sown on these fields for silage.

Maize crops are irrigated two or three times with water from a local lake. A water pump is used for speed, but it is also possible to flood irrigate most fields.

Mixed grass and lucerne is made into large round bales of hay, with up to five cuts taken each year. Some fields of pure lucerne or ryegrass are also grown for hay.

Forage fields can also be irrigated but care must be taken when irrigating lucerne or it will not last over two or three years, adds Mr Arioli.

Later cuts of hay can be dried under cover where a fan is installed to blow air through floor ducts drying the bales that are stood on end. But fifth cuts are made into round bale silage.

Concentrates are mixed once a week and then added to forage each day in the self-loading feeder that Mr Arioli claims can chop every feedstuff.

The ration is 11kg of mixed concentrates and grain at 18-19% crude protein, 20kg maize silage, 5kg of mixed hay and lucerne hay, to give a 16% crude protein diet.

Cows are housed all year round because of flies in the summer. The buildings are sprayed to aid fly control. &#42

Top Italian sire breeder Angelo Arioli grows as much feed on his 150ha (370-acre) farm as possible for purchased feed costs are currently high.


ITALIAN MANAGEMENT


&#8226 Top bulls used as flushing sires.

&#8226 Production from home-grown feeds essential.

&#8226 Ration fed at 16% crude protein.

FIVE Italian bulls currently in the countrys top 50 were bred at Del Santo Farm, Camairgo, Milan.

Of these five bulls the top three, including the current top Italian bull Corsaro, were bred from one cow in the 300-strong milking herd owned by the Arioli Brothers. This infamous Italian bull mother is Del Santo Mark Jamaica, a Chief Mark out of a Tony, which classifies VG 89. She gave 8445kg at 4.2% fat and 3.6% protein in her first lactation.

Her three sons are Del Santo Corsaro (see table p42) by Aerostar with an ILQM of 2339 and +2.13 on type, Del Santo Smith by Cleitus (ILQM 1766), and Del Santo Damasco by Leadman (ILQM 1986).

These bulls are now being used as sires across the herd – founded mainly on US and Canadian genetics – together with some progeny test semen, the Canadian bull Rudolph and the US bull Patron.

Angelo Arioli says that because top bulls are very expensive they are only used when flushing cows for embryo transfer. He is currently using Fatal and Lord Lilly as flushing sires.

Herd average yield is 9920kg at 3.7% fat and 3.34% protein. The highest indexing cow in the herd gave 12,000kg at 3.2% fat and 3.3% protein in her first lactation. But cow yields are restricted by quota. In the last quota year milk production was 5000 litres below quota, claims Mr Arioli.

"We must stay within quota. When quotas were introduced some large farmers found a way around it, but not now. Quota is good for the market as Italy produces 10-15% too much milk."

This year extra quota for the herd has been purchased at 30p a litre. The current milk price is 34p a litre.

However forage and grain production are key concerns on the 150ha (370-acre) farm, because purchased feed costs are 20% higher than last year.

The farm grows much of its own feed – only buying in soyabean meal, linseed, brewers grains, broken biscuits, minerals and vitamins.

Home-grown barley and high moisture maize grain or ground maize are also included in cow rations.

"High moisture corn is an excellent energy source at low cost," says Mr Arioli. "It also decreases milk fat so is good for quota."

The long growing season, warm climate and irrigation allow winter-sown barley to be harvested in mid-June so maize can be sown on these fields for silage.

Maize crops are irrigated two or three times with water from a local lake. A water pump is used for speed, but it is also possible to flood irrigate most fields.

Mixed grass and lucerne is made into large round bales of hay, with up to five cuts taken each year. Some fields of pure lucerne or ryegrass are also grown for hay.

Forage fields can also be irrigated but care must be taken when irrigating lucerne or it will not last over two or three years, adds Mr Arioli.

Later cuts of hay can be dried under cover where a fan is installed to blow air through floor ducts drying the bales that are stood on end. But fifth cuts are made into round bale silage.

Concentrates are mixed once a week and then added to forage each day in the self-loading feeder that Mr Arioli claims can chop every feedstuff.

The ration is 11kg of mixed concentrates and grain at 18-19% crude protein, 20kg maize silage, 5kg of mixed hay and lucerne hay, to give a 16% crude protein diet.

Cows are housed all year round because of flies in the summer. The buildings are sprayed to aid fly control. &#42