Campaign for light lambs is paying off - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Campaign for light lambs is paying off

By Robert Davies, Wales correspondent

EFFORTS to promote sales of Welsh light lambs are paying off, according to a recent Farmers Union of Wales telephone survey of abattoirs and retailers.

Last week 2500 lambs were processed by Cwmni Cig Mon abattoirs for a special promotion with the Iceland chain.

Managing director, Owen Owen, reports that the boxed packs of legs and shoulders “sold like hot cakes”.

His company is paying farmers 1.50/kg dw for small lambs, which means a return of 18 on a 12kg lamb worth only 10 on the Governments welfare disposal scheme.

Farmers First chairman Terry Bayliss claims the companys joint promotion with farmers weekly is going much better than expected.

“In the first three weeks we sold well over 1000 boxes and are now averaging 70 orders a day,” says Mr Bayliss.

The 12kg whole lamb boxes sell for 65, including packaging and delivery to the door. Of this, 2 goes to the ARC-Arlington Fund which helps victims of the foot-and-mouth crisis.

While the FUW is delighted to have found a good news story, it is concerned about market displacement.

“We must hope that the demand for, and price of, heavier lambs will not suffer as a result of the prices being offered for the light lambs,” says Eifion Huws, chairman of the unions Anglesey branch.

 Give light lamb a lift- order your box of lamb here

FREE NEWS UPDATE
CLICK HERE to receive FWis FREE new daily email newsletter to keep up-to-date with the latest farming news and foot-and-mouth updates

Foot-and-mouth – confirmed outbreaks
Foot-and-mouth – FWi coverage
    Read more on:
  • News

Campaign for light lambs is paying off

21 September 2001

Campaign for light lambs is paying off

By Robert Davies

Wales correspondent

EFFORTS to promote sales of Welsh light lambs are paying off, according to a recent telephone survey of abattoirs and retailers.

The Farmers Union of Wales talked to all major supermarkets to assess whether campaigning needed to be stepped up to get as many mountain lambs as possible into shops, rather than landfill sites.

"The really good news is when customers get the chance to eat lambs that are normally exported to southern Europe, they likethe taste," says Bob Parry, FUW president.

Last week Cwmni Cig Mon, which has abattoirs at Llangefni and St Asaph, processed 2500 lambs for a special promotion with the Deeside-based Iceland chain. Managing director, Owen Owen, reports that the boxed packs of legs and shoulders "sold like hot cakes".

"The huge demand has surprised us all and we expect it to increase even further. There are 760 Iceland stores and those in the south of England are selling out almost as soon as the packs are put out on the shelves."

His company is paying farmers £1.50/kg dw for small lambs, which means a return of £18 ona 12kg lamb worth only £10 onthe Governments welfare disposal scheme.

Terry Bayliss, chairman of Farmers First, claims the companys joint promotion with farmers weekly is going much better than expected, especially in Hampshire, Surrey and Sussex.

"In the first three weeks we sold well over 1000 boxes and are now averaging 70 orders a day," says Mr Bayliss.

The 12kg whole lamb boxes sell for £65, including packaging and delivery to the door. Of this, £2 goes to the ARC-Arlington Fund which helps victims of the foot-and-mouth crisis.

Welsh Lamb and Beef Promotions, which is in daily contact with major retailers, claims that sales are "extraordinarily good".

While the FUW is delighted to have found a good news story, it is concerned about market displacement, and the impact of the special promotions on the demand for, and price of, standard lambs.

"We must all hope that the price of heavier lambs will not suffer as a result of the prices being offered for the light lambs," says Eifion Huws, chairman of the unions Anglesey branch. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus