Dairy Event 2009: Silage Advisory Centre launched - Farmers Weekly

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Dairy Event 2009: Silage Advisory Centre launched

A new ‘Silage Advisory Centre’ to support farmers’ decision making was launched at this year’s Dairy Event and Livestock Show.

The centre offers independent, down to earth advice to help farmers maximise their forage and grassland management by using big baled silage effectively, said Dave Davies, Agricultural outreach manager at Aberystwyth University.

The centre will set up a number of demonstration farms, case studies, advice sheets, seminars, forums and provide advice via its website, www.silageadvice.com.

“The system acts as an essential source of information for farmers weighing up the pros and cons of different systems, processes and materials,” Mr Davies said.

The centre has three main aims; to integrate big bale silage with every farm management system, encourage conventional farmers to use red clover to reduce fertiliser inputs, and consider producing some high quality, low D value silage as an alternative to straw in the ration.

“The cost of big baled silage may be more than clamped silage, but farmers will not see the dry matter losses associated with clamping – so they are similar in terms of kg of dry matter fed,” he added.

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Dairy Event 2009: Silage Advisory Centre launched

A new ‘Silage Advisory Centre’ to support farmers’ decision making was launched at this year’s Dairy Event and Livestock Show.

The centre offers independent, down to earth advice to help farmers maximise their forage and grassland management by using big baled silage effectively, said Dave Davies, Agricultural outreach manager at Aberystwyth University.

The centre will set up a number of demonstration farms, case studies, advice sheets, seminars, forums and provide advice via its website, www.silageadvice.com.

“The system acts as an essential source of information for farmers weighing up the pros and cons of different systems, processes and materials,” Mr Davies said.

The centre has three main aims; to integrate big bale silage with every farm management system, encourage conventional farmers to use red clover to reduce fertiliser inputs, and consider producing some high quality, low D value silage as an alternative to straw in the ration.

“The cost of big baled silage may be more than clamped silage, but farmers will not see the dry matter losses associated with clamping – so they are similar in terms of kg of dry matter fed,” he added.

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