September is on course to be the driest in the UK since records began in 1910, according to the Met Office.

From 1-28 September, the country received only 19.4mm of rain –about 20% of the normal amount.

Northern Ireland was the driest with only 6.5mm of rain, just 7% of the average.

Scotland was the wettest with 33.3mm of rain, about 24% of the average. But it was still set to be the second driest September on record.

Forecasters said the exceptionally dry weather was caused by high pressure dominating the country for much of the month.

“The results show a broadly positive picture and even if rainfall is below average this autumn the country will not go into drought.”
Trevor Bishop, Environment Agency deputy director of water resources

Read also: Dry start to September hinders crop establishment

The record low rainfall this September follows the eighth wettest August on record and comes in a generally very wet year.

January to August was the wettest such period in the records, mainly as a result of the wet start to the year and the wettest winter on record.

As a result, water resources were “around normal for the time of year”, said Environment Agency deputy director of water resources, Trevor Bishop.

“We also look ahead by modelling how rivers and groundwater may respond to different future rainfall patterns,” he added.

“The results show a broadly positive picture and even if rainfall is below average this autumn the country will not go into drought.”

However, dramatic images of a half-empty reservoir in Cumbria showed the impact of the lack of rainfall.

Haweswater Reservoir
The Haweswater Reservoir at its usual September levels.

Normally, at this time of year, Haweswater Reservoir is brimful. But it is now so empty that farms and villages flooded in the 1930s to create the reservoir have re-emerged.

Haweswater Reservoir
The Haweswater Reservoir this September.

Pictures showed farm tracks and field boundaries and rubble from the deserted farmsteads.

Send us your pictures or email your views on the driest September to philip.case@rbi.co.uk.