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East Cornwall next for badger cull

24 March 1999
East Cornwall next for badger cull

EAST Cornwall will be the next area targeted by governments badger cull aimed at proving whether the animals transmit tuberculosis to cattle …more…


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East Cornwall next for badger cull

24 March 1999
East Cornwall next for badger cull

By FWi staff

EAST Cornwall will be the next area targeted by governments badger cull aimed at proving whether the animals transmit tuberculosis to cattle.

But many people, including farmers as well as wildlife conservationists, remain critical of the governments TB-control strategy.

Food Safety Minister Jeff Rooker yesterday named East Cornwall as the third of 10 areas in which badgers will be culled to address the problem of TB in cattle.

The governments Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB will start surveying the area shortly, and badger culling will begin later this year.

East Cornwall was chosen because it has shown one of the largest increases in TB cases over the past six months.

But TB is continuing to spread alarmingly in Gloucestershire – one of the areas targeted last summer for a badger cull.

The badger population has increased by 86% since badgers became a protected species in 1992, according to the National Farmers Union (NFU).

The NFU also claims that the Badger Protection Act has had a “significant influence” on a 40% increase in bovine TB over the last two years.

Tim Bennett, deputy president of the National Farmers Union, said the government was doing too little to help farmers overcome the problem of TB in cattle.

“Farmers and their families are under an intolerable level of stress,” he said.

“There is an enormous financial burden imposed on farm businesses and there are major concerns for cattle welfare.”

Meanwhile, hundreds of wildlife campaigners gathered in the Forest of Dean last Saturday to protest against the badger cull.

Conservationists claim that the cull will lead to the death of up to 20,000 badgers across the country.

An estimated 600 people lay on the hillside near Cinderford in a mass demonstration against a cull which is time-tabled to start there next month.

“Its been a great success and spells out a clear message from the Forest of Dean to Westminster,” organiser Jane Fry told the Gloucestershire Echo.

“These are your normal, average people here – not the sort of person who will demonstrate at the drop of a hat.”

The protest was filmed by event the BBC Wildlife Unit and will be shown in a TV documentary on the badger cull to be broadcast on 5 May.

    Read more on:
  • News

East Cornwall next for badger cull

24 March 1999
East Cornwall next for badger cull

EAST Cornwall will be the next area targeted by governments badger cull aimed at proving whether the animals transmit tuberculosis to cattle …more…


todays news



Euro1 = £0.6706 £1 = Euro1.491 
Creditworthy customers?
FWi Company Check gives peace of mind

Try the service for free – phone 0181-652 4903
ADAS, CLA and NFU membership services
Click the logos
        



    Read more on:
  • News

East Cornwall next for badger cull

24 March 1999
East Cornwall next for badger cull

By FWi staff

EAST Cornwall will be the next area targeted by governments badger cull aimed at proving whether the animals transmit tuberculosis to cattle.

But many people, including farmers as well as wildlife conservationists, remain critical of the governments TB-control strategy.

Food Safety Minister Jeff Rooker yesterday named East Cornwall as the third of 10 areas in which badgers would be culled to address the problem of TB in cattle.

The governments Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB will start surveying the area shortly and letter, he said.

East Cornwall was chosen because it has shown one of the largest increases in TB cases over the past six months.

Farmers in the area will receive letters urging them to take part in the trial before badger culling begins later in the year.

But farmers in Gloucestershire – one of the areas targeted last summer for a badger cull – are worried that TB is continuing to spread alarmingly.

Since badgers became a protected species in 1992, the badger population has increased by 86%, according to the National Farmers Union (NFU).

The NFU also claims that the Badger Protection Act has had a “significant influence” on a 40% increase in bovine TB over the last two years.

Tim Bennett, deputy president of the National Farmers Union, said the government was doing too little to help farmers overcome the problem of TB in cattle.

“Farmers and their families are under an intolerable level of stress,” he said.

“There is an enormous financial burden imposed on farm businesses and there are major concerns for cattle welfare.”

Meanwhile, hundreds of wildlife campaigners gathered in the Forest of Dean last Saturday to protest against the badger cull.

Conservationists claim that the cull will lead to the death of up to 20,000 badgers across the country.

An estimated 600 people lay on the hillside near Cinderford in a mass demonstration against a cull which is time-tabled to start there next month.

“Its been a great success and spells out a clear message from the Forest of Dean to Westminster,” organiser Jane Fry told the Gloucestershire Echo.

“These are your normal, average people here – not the sort of person who will demonstrate at the drop of a hat.”

The protest was filmed by event the BBC Wildlife Unit and will be shown in a TV documentary on the badger cull to be broadcast on 5 May.

    Read more on:
  • News
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