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EU scientists back bone-in ban

24 February 1998
EU scientists back bone-in ban

EUROPEAN Union scientists appear to have endorsed the UK beef-on-the-bone ban.

They named dorsal root ganglia, connected to the spinal column, as one of four main infective areas of cattle suffering from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This was the main reason for the UKs ban.

The European Commission will consider a report tomorrow from the scientific steering committee as it decides what to do next.

    Read more on:
  • News

EU scientists back bone-in ban

24 February 1998
EU scientists back bone-in ban

EUROPEAN Union scientists appear to have endorsed the UK beef-on-the-bone ban.

They named dorsal root ganglia, connected to the spinal column, as one of four main infective areas of cattle suffering from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This was the main reason for the UKs ban.

The European Commission will consider a report tomorrow from the scientific steering committee as it decides what to do next.

I

    Read more on:
  • News

EU scientists back bone-in ban

24 February 1998
EU scientists back bone-in ban

EUROPEAN Union scientists appear to have endorsed the UK beef-on-the-bone ban.

They named dorsal root ganglia, connected to the spinal column, as one of four main infective areas of cattle suffering from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This was the main reason for the UKs ban.

The European Commission will consider a report tomorrow from the scientific steering committee as it decides what to do next.

It could seek a further three-month delay in implementing a ban on specified risk material (SRM) as it attempts to strengthen its policies.

An amended SRM ban could force countries with a history of the disease to implement tougher regulations. These could include a ban on the sale of meat attached to the vertebral column of cattle, sheep and goats.

Germany and seven other EU nations could be given official “BSE-free” status. The plan is being discussed by the European Commission and the British EU presidency. It would involve waiving proposed new meat-hygiene rules for countries which have had no cases of the disease in domestically-bred cattle.

It follows German warnings that the Bonn Government would oppose moves to ease the ban on British meat unless Germany is exempted from the new scheme. The Independent reports eight EU countries could be declared BSE-free, while seven others would be classified at risk under proposals for a “mad cow league table” being drawn up in Brussels.

  • Financial Times 24/02/98 page 22
  • The Times 24/02/98 page 2
  • The Daily Telegraph 24/02/98 page 6
  • The Independent 24/02/98 page 8

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