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Farmers to save 50m, says NFU

8 November 2001
Farmers to save 50m, says NFU

By Olivia Cooper

FARMERS will save 50 million a year following the Bank of Englands decision to cut interest rates, says the NFU.

The BoE cut rates on Thursday (8 November) by 0.5%, to 4%, the lowest level since 1963.

With borrowings of almost 10bn, the farming industry stands to save 50m/year in reduced interest payments, says the NFUs Ian Gardiner.

“This is a real benefit to hard-pressed farmers.

Unfortunately, it has not yet affected exchange rates, which would have a far greater impact on farm incomes.”

A 1% weakening of Sterling against the Euro would boost farm output by 80m.

The cut is much more aggressive than expected, and follows Tuesdays US Federal Reserve cut of 0.5% to 2% – the lowest in almost 40 years.

The European Central Bank also surprised some pundits by following the trend with a cut to 3.25%.

However, there is a flip side to the argument, as savings and bonds will have a slower rate of growth than before.

But it is hard to put a figure on farm savings, as these accounts tend to be separated from the farm business account, says Mr Gardiner.

    Read more on:
  • News

Farmers to save 50m, says NFU

By Olivia Cooper

FARMERS will save 50 million a year following the Bank of Englands decision to cut interest rates, says the NFU.

The BoE cut rates on Thursday (8 November) by 0.5%, to 4%, the lowest level since 1963.

With borrowings of almost 10bn, the farming industry stands to save 50m/year in reduced interest payments, says the NFUs Ian Gardiner.

“This is a real benefit to hard-pressed farmers.

Unfortunately, it has not yet affected exchange rates, which would have a far greater impact on farm incomes.”

A 1% weakening of Sterling against the Euro would boost farm output by 80m.

The cut is much more aggressive than expected, and follows Tuesdays US Federal Reserve cut of 0.5% to 2% – the lowest in almost 40 years.

The European Central Bank also surprised some pundits by following the trend with a cut to 3.25%.

However, there is a flip side to the argument, as savings and bonds will have a slower rate of growth than before.

But it is hard to put a figure on farm savings, as these accounts tend to be separated from the farm business account, says Mr Gardiner.

    Read more on:
  • News
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