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Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay …more…



The recent increase in the use of FWi has far exceeded our expectations. This has meant that, at certain times, some users may experience a problem requesting pages. We are currently upgrading the hardware to accommodate this increase and this work will be completed by 19 March. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

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Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

By Johann Tasker

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay.

More than 80,000 seasonal and casual workers will earn barely more than the minimum wage of £3.60 following Agricultural Wages Board talks in London.

  demonstration
Farmworkers from Norfolk and Suffolk demonstrating outside NFU headquarters in Norwich last weekend

The employees, on whom many farmers depend during harvest, will earn £3.69 an hour from 6 June, compared with the current amount of £3.21 an hour.

The new amount is 9p more than the £3.60 minimum wage which will be introduced on 1 April to combat what Tony Blair has called “the scandal of poverty pay”

The settlement provides for a 2.5% increase for all farmworkers in England and Wales, taking the basic rate for full-time workers on a 39-hour week to £170.23.

Have your say - click here  

The workers were represented in the talks by the Rural Agricultural and Allied Workers (RAAW) group of the Transport and General Workers Union.

The union claims that farm subsidies increased by 44% between 1994 and 1998, compared with a wage increase for farmworkers of only 7.5% over the same period.

Barry Leathwood, RAAW national secretary, said the union recognised the current difficulties and low incomes faced by many farmers.

But the settlement meant that many full-time UK workers would still earn less than the Council of Europes “decency threshold” for wages, he added.

Mr Leathwood said the unions campaign would continue for a contributory pension scheme for farm workers and a reduction in the working week from 39 to 35 hours.

Both claims were rejected by the National Farmers Union (NFU) which said that farmers were not in a position to increase wages.

The total income from farming fell by 29% during 1998 – a drop equivalent to 32% in real terms, according to statistics from the Ministry of Agriculture.

NFU wage negotiator Bob Fiddaman described the new rates as “broadly fair”, but campaigners against low wages urged farmers to think again.

“In no way would we consider that kind of rate as acceptable,” said Bharti Patel, director of the Low Pay Unit.

“Farmers are discriminating against the most vulnerable casual workers when regular workers are getting a higher wage.”

    Read more on:
  • News

Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay …more…



The recent increase in the use of FWi has far exceeded our expectations. This has meant that, at certain times, some users may experience a problem requesting pages. We are currently upgrading the hardware to accommodate this increase and this work will be completed by 19 March. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

todays news



Euro = £0.676  £1 = E1.479 
Creditworthy customers?
FWi Company Check gives peace of mind

Try the service for free – phone 0181-652 4903
ADAS, CLA and NFU membership services
Click the logos
     



    Read more on:
  • News

Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

By Johann Tasker

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay.

  demonstration
Farmworkers from Norfolk and Suffolk demonstrating outside NFU headquarters in Norwich last weekend

More than 80,000 seasonal and casual workers will earn barely more than the minimum wage of £3.60 following Agricultural Wages Board talks in London.

The employees, on whom many farmers depend during harvest, will earn £3.69 an hour from 6 June, compared with the current amount of £3.21 an hour.

The new amount is 9p more than the £3.60 minimum wage which will be introduced on 1 April to combat what Tony Blair has called “the scandal of poverty pay”

The settlement provides for a 2.5% increase for all farmworkers in England and Wales, taking the basic rate for full-time workers on a 39-hour week to £170.23.

Have your say - click here  

The workers were represented in the talks by the Rural Agricultural and Allied Workers (RAAW) group of the Transport and General Workers Union.

The union claims that farm subsidies increased by 44% between 1994 and 1998, compared with a wage increase for farmworkers of only 7.5% over the same period.

Barry Leathwood, RAAW national secretary, said the union recognised the current difficulties and low incomes faced by many farmers.

But the settlement meant that many full-time UK workers would still earn less than the Council of Europes “decency threshold” for wages, he added.

Mr Leathwood said the unionís campaign would continue for a contributory pension scheme for farm workers and a reduction in the working week from 39 to 35 hours.

Both claims were rejected by the National Farmers Union (NFU) which said that farmers were not in a position to increase wages.

The total income from farming fell by 29% during 1998 – a drop equivalent to 32% in real terms, according to statistics from the Ministry of Agriculture.

NFU wage negotiator Bob Fiddaman described the new rates as “broadly fair”, but campaigners against low wages urged farmers to think again.

“In no way would we consider that kind of rate as acceptable,” said Bharti Patel, director of the Low Pay Unit.

“Farmers are discriminating against the most vulnerable casual workers when regular workers are getting a higher wage.”

    Read more on:
  • News

Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay …more…



The recent increase in the use of FWi has far exceeded our expectations. This has meant that, at certain times, some users may experience a problem requesting pages. We are currently upgrading the hardware to accommodate this increase and this work will be completed by 19 March. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

todays news



Euro = £0.676  £1 = E1.479 
Creditworthy customers?
FWi Company Check gives peace of mind

Try the service for free – phone 0181-652 4903
ADAS, CLA and NFU membership services
Click the logos
     



    Read more on:
  • News

Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

18 March 1999
Farmworkers just 9p above breadline

By Johann Tasker

THOUSANDS of farmworkers will find themselves just 9p away from poverty this summer after farmers leaders rejected their claim for better pay.

More than 80,000 seasonal and casual workers will earn barely more than the minimum wage of £3.60 following Agricultural Wages Board talks in London.

  demonstration
Farmworkers from Norfolk and Suffolk demonstrating outside NFU headquarters in Norwich last weekend

The employees, on whom many farmers depend during harvest, will earn £3.69 an hour from 6 June, compared with the current amount of £3.21 an hour.

The new amount is 9p more than the £3.60 minimum wage which will be introduced on 1 April to combat what Tony Blair has called “the scandal of poverty pay”

The settlement provides for a 2.5% increase for all farmworkers in England and Wales, taking the basic rate for full-time workers on a 39-hour week to £170.23.

Have your say - click here  

The workers were represented in the talks by the Rural Agricultural and Allied Workers (RAAW) group of the Transport and General Workers Union.

The union claims that farm subsidies increased by 44% between 1994 and 1998, compared with a wage increase for farmworkers of only 7.5% over the same period.

Barry Leathwood, RAAW national secretary, said the union recognised the current difficulties and low incomes faced by many farmers.

But the settlement meant that many full-time UK workers would still earn less than the Council of Europes “decency threshold” for wages, he added.

Mr Leathwood said the unionís campaign would continue for a contributory pension scheme for farm workers and a reduction in the working week from 39 to 35 hours.

Both claims were rejected by the National Farmers Union (NFU) which said that farmers were not in a position to increase wages.

The total income from farming fell by 29% during 1998 – a drop equivalent to 32% in real terms, according to statistics from the Ministry of Agriculture.

NFU wage negotiator Bob Fiddaman described the new rates as “broadly fair”, but campaigners against low wages urged farmers to think again.

“In no way would we consider that kind of rate as acceptable,” said Bharti Patel, director of the Low Pay Unit.

“Farmers are discriminating against the most vulnerable casual workers when regular workers are getting a higher wage.”

    Read more on:
  • News
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