Fischler back to cut EU farm subsidy? - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £133
Saving £46
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Fischler back to cut EU farm subsidy?

05 July 1999
Fischler back to cut EU farm subsidy?

THE return of Franz Fischler to the post of European Union farm commissioner could mean a cut in farm subsidies, reports the Financial Times.

Dr Fischler resigned his post, along with other European commissioners, earlier this year, but has since been working in a caretaker capacity.

He is the architect of the EU plans to impose quotas on farm trade with eastern Europe, and the culmination of this policy would mean further subsidy cuts, says the FT.

Eastern European countries – including Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary – have long complained about EU exports to the east.

They say the exports represent unfair competition because of the subsidy to EU producers under the Common Agricultural Policy.

The European Commission last month proposed a replacement of the existing farm trade arrangements with quotas for goods to be traded more freely.

A similar quota arrangement was proposed for east European exports heading westwards.

By increasing the quotas steadily it is planned that most of the trade between the two blocs would be eventually free of subsidy.

But the plan – likely to be implemented if Fischler is appointed a commissioner again – could to run into opposition from concerned farmers in the EU.

    Read more on:
  • News

Fischler back to cut EU farm subsidy?

05 July 1999
Fischler back to cut EU farm subsidy?

THE return of Franz Fischler to the post of European Union farm commissioner could mean a cut in farm subsidies, reports the Financial Times.

Dr Fischler resigned his post, along with other European commissioners, earlier this year, but has since been working in a caretaker capacity.

He is the architect of the EU plans to impose quotas on farm trade with eastern Europe, and the culmination of this policy would mean further subsidy cuts, says the FT.

Eastern European countries – including Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary – have long complained about EU exports to the east.

They say the exports represent unfair competition because of the subsidy to EU producers under the Common Agricultural Policy.

The European Commission last month proposed a replacement of the existing farm trade arrangements with quotas for goods to be traded more freely.

A similar quota arrangement was proposed for east European exports heading westwards.

By increasing the quotas steadily it is planned that most of the trade between the two blocs would be eventually free of subsidy.

But the plan – likely to be implemented if Fischler is appointed a commissioner again – could to run into opposition from concerned farmers in the EU.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus