HGCA funds hunt for lindane substitute - Farmers Weekly

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HGCA funds hunt for lindane substitute

12 August 1999
HGCA funds hunt for lindane substitute

By FWi staff

A REPLACEMENT for banned seed treatment lindane is to be sought, courtesy of the Home-Grown Cereals Authority (HGCA).

Trials funded by the Authority will look for a substitute product to control flea-beetles now that lindane (gamma-HCH) can no longer be used.

Lindane was banned from the end of June this year due to operator risk, but several potential replacements have been identified.

It was used as a standard treatment to over 90% of oilseed rape and other brassica crops in the UK to control flea-beetle attacks on germinating seedlings.

The withdrawal of lindane may mean that additional sprays will be necessary to provide control on cabbage stem flea beetle and Phyllotreta cabbage flea beetle.

ADAS entomologist Jon Oakley said more attention would need to be given to the assessment and control of damage by adult flea beetles.

He believes two autumn sprays with pyrethroids may be needed, costing growers an extra £4 million.

Serious Phyllotreta damage has been rare on winter oilseed rape, although it is not known if this is due to routine seed treatment of oilseed and brassica crops keeping populations below damaging levels.

    Read more on:
  • News

HGCA funds hunt for lindane substitute

12 August 1999
HGCA funds hunt for lindane substitute

By FWi staff

A REPLACEMENT for banned seed treatment lindane is to be sought, courtesy of the Home-Grown Cereals Authority (HGCA).

Trials funded by the Authority will look for a substitute product to control flea-beetles no that lindane (gamma-HCH) can no longer be used.

Lindane was banned from the end of June this year due to operator risk, but several potential replacements have been identified.

It was used as a standard treatment to over 90% of oilseed rape and other brassica crops in the UK to control flea-beetle attacks on germinating seedlings.

The withdrawal of lindane may mean that additional sprays will be necessary to provide control on cabbage stem flea beetle and Phyllotreta cabbage flea beetle.

ADAS entomologist Jon Oakley said more attention would need to be given to the assessment and control of damage by adult flea beetles.

He believes two autumn sprays with pyrethroids may be needed, costing growers an extra £4 million.

Serious Phyllotreta damage has been rare on winter oilseed rape, although it is not known if this is due to routine seed treatment of oilseed and brassica crops keeping populations below damaging levels.

    Read more on:
  • News
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