3 July 1998

Jaagsiekte ET find

LAMBS born to recipients of jaagsiekte (ovine pulmonary adenomatosis) carrying embryos do not carry the virus, meaning embryo transfer could be used to safeguard superior genetics from infected flocks.

Vet Ben Parker and colleagues from MAFFs vet labs, Addlestone, Surrey, implanted embryos from infected ewes fertilised by uninfected rams, and vice versa, into uninfected recipient ewes.

No evidence of jaagsiekte was found in either the recipients or their progeny in either study. The researchers conclude in their report (Vet Record, June 20 1998) that embryo transfer can be used to provide an effective barrier against transmission of jaagsiekte from donors from infected flocks whether or not the parents show clinical signs of the disease.

The disease is contagious, and affected adult sheep suffer severe respiratory distress when shepherded. When infected sheep are held with their heads lowered, large volumes of clear infectious mucous will flow from the sheeps nostrils. &#42