Labelling bill fails second reading - Farmers Weekly

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Labelling bill fails second reading

3 March 2000
Labelling bill fails second reading

By FWi staff

FARMERS have failed to persuade MPs that pigmeat should be labelled so consumers can identify imported supplies produced to substandard conditions.

A private members Bill to introduce pigmeat labelling failed in its second reading in the House of Commons on Friday (3 March).

The Bill for better labelling laws was proposed by Stephen OBrien, the Tory MP for Eddisbury, Cheshire. It was supported by the National Pig Association.

Pig farmers claim they are being driven out of business by pigmeat imports which fail to match up to the animal welfare standards imposed on UK producers.

British consumers are often unaware they are buying foreign pork because imported pigmeat can be labelled British if it is processed in the UK.

Junior agriculture minister Joyce Quin said she had supported the Bills intentions but added that it would not have achieved its aims.

“In the future, we still need to build on European common standards. If we oppose things unilaterally, the marketing advantage in theory will be lost.”

    Read more on:
  • News

Labelling Bill fails second reading

3 March 2000
Labelling Bill fails second reading

By FWi staff

FARMERS have failed to persuade MPs that pigmeat should be labelled so consumers can identify imported supplies produced to substandard conditions.

A private members Bill to introduce pigmeat labelling failed in its second reading in the House of Commons on Friday (3 March).

The Bill for better labelling laws was proposed by Stephen OBrien, the Tory MP for Eddisbury, Cheshire. It was supported by the National Pig Association.

Pig farmers claim they are being driven out of business by pigmeat imports which fail to match up to the animal welfare standards imposed on UK producers.

British consumers are often unaware they are buying foreign pork because imported pigmeat can be labelled British if it is processed in the UK.

Junior agriculture minister Joyce Quin said she had supported the Bills intentions but added that it would not have achieved its aims.

“In the future, we still need to build on European common standards. If we oppose things unilaterally, the marketing advantage in theory will be lost.”

    Read more on:
  • News
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