Labour U-turn on right to roam - Farmers Weekly

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Labour U-turn on right to roam

08 March 1999
Labour U-turn on right to roam

THE government appears to have abandoned its pre-election pledge to introduce a statutory right to roam across certain types of countryside …more…
todays news



Euro = £0.6776 



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Labour U-turn on right to roam

08 March 1999
Labour U-turn on right to roam

THE government appears to have abandoned its pre-election pledge to introduce a statutory right to roam across certain types of countryside …more…
todays news



Euro = £0.6737



    Read more on:
  • News

Labour U-turn on right to roam

08 March 1999
Labour U-turn on right to roam

By FWi staff

THE government appears to have abandoned its pre-election pledge to introduce a statutory right to roam across certain types of countryside.

Environment minister Michael Meacher is expected to unveil plans this afternoon (Monday) that will fall short of Labours promise to guarantee access to the countryside.

Mr Meacher is set to announce proposals that would combine voluntary and legal measures and open up certain types of countryside – but will not guarantee full access.

The proposals would establish the principal of right to roam over mountain, moor, heath, down and common land, but access would be agreed through regional forums.

Ramblers see the move as a watering-down of Labour;s pre-election pledges, which promised a right to roam enshrined in law.

“If the Government now backs down on the issue many people will feel betrayed,” said David Beskine, assistant director of the Ramblers Association.

The plans are also likely to enrage many Labour backbenchers who are backing a private members bill from Gordon Prentice for a statutory right to roam.

A recent NOP survey commissioned by the Ramblers Association, found 83% of adults want MPs to vote for the bill, with only 13% against.

The Prentice bill, if enacted, would grant the public the access subject to commonsense restrictions to protect crops, animals and the environment.

But it is now clear that the Government will block the bill by refusing to give it enough parliamentary time.

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