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Lords GM food report biased

23 January 1999
Lords’ GM food report ‘biased’

CONSUMER and environmental groups have accused the House of Lords of bias in its reports on genetically modified (GM) crops.

The report, released last Thursday, dismissed objections to GM crops on environmental and health grounds, saying the benefits of the technology outweighed any risks.

The accusations of bias centre on the fact that nine of the 12 peers sitting on the Lords committee are farmers or have interests in the food industry.

The Guardian yesterday published a list of the peers which included Lord Jopling, who holds shares in Zeneca, one of the biggest biotechnology companies.

The peers are also accused of taking evidence mostly from people who had financial interests in the development of the technology.

    Read more on:
  • News

Lords GM food report biased

23 January 1999
Lords’ GM food report ‘biased’

CONSUMER and environmental groups have accused the House of Lords of bias in its reports on genetically modified (GM) crops.

The report, released last Thursday, dismissed objections to GM crops on environmental and health grounds, saying the benefits of the technology outweighed any risks.

The accusations of bias centre on the fact that nine of the 12 peers sitting on the Lords committee are farmers or have interests in the food industry.

The Guardian yesterday published a list of the peers which included Lord Jopling, who holds shares in Zeneca, one of the biggest biotechnology companies.

The peers are also accused of taking evidence mostly from people who had financial interests in the development of the technology.

    Read more on:
  • News

Lords GM food report biased

22 January 1999
Lords’ GM food report ‘biased’

CONSUMER and environmental groups have accused the House of Lords of bias in its reports on genetically modified (GM) crops.

The report, released yesterday (Thursday), dismissed objections to GM crops on environmental and health grounds, saying the benefits of the technology outweighed any risks.

HAVE YOUR SAY

Were the Lords right?
Or should we worry about genetically modified produce?

Click here to send your views to FWi

  The accusations of bias centre on the fact that 9 of the 12 peers sitting on the Lords committee are farmers or have interests in the food industry.

The Guardian today published a list of the peers who included, Lord Jopling, a shareholder in Zeneca, one of the biggest biotechnology companies.

The peers are also accused of taking evidence mostly from people who had financial interests in the development of the technology.

    Read more on:
  • News

Lords GM food report biased

22 January 1999
Lords’ GM food report ‘biased’

CONSUMER and environmental groups have accused the House of Lords of bias in its reports on genetically modified (GM) crops.

The report, released yesterday (Thursday), dismissed objections to GM crops on environmental and health grounds, saying the benefits of the technology outweighed any risks.

HAVE YOUR SAY

Were the Lords right?
Or should we worry about genetically modified produce?

Click here to send your views to FWi

  The accusations of bias centre on the fact that 9 of the 12 peers sitting on the Lords committee are farmers or have interests in the food industry.

The Guardian today published a list of the peers who included, Lord Joplin, a shareholder in Zeneca, one of the biggest biotechnology companies.

The peers are also accused of taking evidence mostly from people who had financial interests in the development of the technology.

    Read more on:
  • News

Lords GM food report biased

22 January 1999
Lords ’ GM food report ‘biased’

CONSUMER and environmental groups have accused the House of Lords of bias in its reports on genetically modified (GM) crops.

The report, released yesterday (Thursday), dismissed objections to GM crops on environmental and health grounds, saying the benefits of the technology outweighed any risks.

The accusations of bias centre on the fact that 9 of the 12 peers sitting on the Lords committee are farmers or have interests in the food industry.

The Guardian today published a list of the peers who included, Lord Joplin, a shareholder in Zeneca, one of the biggest biotechnology companies.

The peers are also accused of taking evidence mostly from people who had financial interests in the development of the technology.

  • The Guardian 22/01/99 page 14

    Read more on:
  • News
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