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Meat inspectors close abattoirs

02 February 1999
Meat inspectors close abattoirs

MEAT production at some of the countrys largest abattoirs is at a standstill because of the one-day strike involving meat inspectors, claims the trade union Unison …more…
todays news



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Meat inspectors close abattoirs

02 February 1999
Meat inspectors close abattoirs

MEAT production at some of the countrys largest abattoirs is at a standstill because of the one-day strike involving meat inspectors, claims the trade union Unison …more…
todays news



Agrimonetary Euro rate = £0.6888
Creditworthy customers?
FWi Company Check gives peace of mind
Making Money out of Beef – MLC report
Click here for a summary
MLC Interactive Beef Management programme
ADAS, CLA and NFU membership services
Click the logos
    



    Read more on:
  • News

Meat inspectors close abattoirs

02 February 1999
Meat inspectors close abattoirs

By FWi staff

MEAT production at some of the countrys largest abattoirs is at a standstill because of the one-day strike involving meat inspectors, claims the trade union Unison.

Up to 1000 inspectors in a pay dispute are picketing slaughterhouses in action which could disrupt meat supplies to retailers and cause a backlog of livestock on farms.

“Most of the large production plants have been closed,” claimed a spokesman for the trade union Unison.

In Scotland, independent reports say only plants with a full complement of inspectors are slaughtering livestock.

The Scottish Association of Meat Wholesalers warns that further action by meat hygiene inspectors would put jobs at risk.

But processing standards will not be compromised by the strike, says the association, which has a daily turnover of £3 million.

In the midlands, many plants which are not producing meat are operating their cutting rooms, where meat already inspected is being cut by staff.

The meat-cutting is being overseen by veterinary inspectors in a contingency plan which the Meat Hygiene Service (MHS) hopes will minimise the effects of the strike.

“More than 500 veterinarians work for the MHS on a contract basis and they will be continuing to attend premises and enforce hygiene and welfare laws,” said Barry Gidman, MHS regional director.

The strike follows a dispute which began when the inspectors received a 3.65% pay-rise from the Ministry of Agriculture (MAFF).

The inspectors are holding out for more money, claiming that other MAFF agencies have received increases of 4.7%.

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