22 December 2000

Old-fashioned & proud of it

I BELIEVE there are two types of farmers wives. I had just met one lady and on hearing she was in farming I said "Oh, youre a farmers wife are you?" She glared at me and in a frosty voice replied "No, I am married to a farmer, but that does not make me a farmers wife." I was amused by this but this lady was horrified that I had seen her as such.

Some wives around me are simply that, they are just married to farmers. They do not support them, they do their own thing and go out to work. I totally believe in the old way. A woman (especially a farmers wife) should always be there for her husband, be at home, warming his slippers and washing, cooking and cleaning for him. In other words doing everything for him. This is how I am.

I am with him 24 hours a day, and we work as a team together. We have four little children and, although I dont do the milking, I do all the sheep and the lambing. I am there for my husband at the drop of a hat at any time.

WFUs Janet Godfrey, has written that "few self-respecting women expect to be homemakers" and "that it is not possible". What a load of rubbish. Even if I was out at work all day, I would never dream of my husband cooking or doing any other chores.

We have spent over 10 years together now and my husband has never done anything in the house, and I wouldnt every expect him to.

When a man (especially a farmer) takes a wife, it is so she can love and look after him and do everything for him and with him. If not why bother meeting a partner. I respect myself and my husband has great respect for me. I do these things because I want to, not because he expects it.

The image of the rosy-faced, plump, cosy farmers wife is a nice one. It is a shame most wives arent like that today. I am not from a farming background although I have always lived in the country. I dont believe that all women are

prepared for this and

ultimately these women are not what farmers want or need.

Perhaps I am old-fashioned, and I dont care. A womans place is in the home, bringing up the family and looking after her man. Its a shame more women arent the same. One thing I must say though, is that proper farmers wives are special people and worth their weight in gold.

Mrs Emma Major,

Beeston Gate Farm, Beeston, Nr Tarporley, Cheshire.