Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £133
Saving £46
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

27 March 1998
Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

THE Government today (Friday) merged the Rural Development Commission and the Countryside Commission to create a single body to champion the cause of rural Britain.

    Read more on:
  • News

Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

27 March 1998
Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

THE Government today (Friday) merged the Rural Development Commission and the Countryside Commission to create a single body to champion the cause of rural Britain.

    Read more on:
  • News

Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

27 March 1998
Rural Development and Countryside Commissions merge

By Boyd Champness

THE Government today (Friday) merged the Rural Development Commission and the Countryside Commission to create a single body to champion the cause of rural Britain.

The body will be given a new name and is expected to start work in April next year. Its roles include:

  • Playing a central role in formulating Government policy on the countryside.
  • Advising the Government, local authorities and the new Regional Development Agencies on countryside issues.
  • Promoting the amenities and the natural beauty of the countryside.
  • Taking countryside issues on board, and promote a living and sustainable countryside to meet the economic and social needs of people living and working there.
Announcing the move, deputy prime minister John Prescott said: “Both Commissions support the concept of a new, merged organisation.”

Miles Middleton, RDC chairman, said the new body would be able to offer comprehensive and authoritative advice on all rural issues and to promote the Governments goals of sustainable development and integrated rural policy.

“This new organisation has the potential to be stronger than the two it replaces,” he said.

But not everyone welcomes the Governments reforms.

In December last year, the then RDC chairman, Lord Shuttleworth, resigned over the Governments decision to set up Regional Development Agencies and make them responsible for rural job creation.

Lord Shuttleworth said the long term viability of the RDC would be jeopardised if it lost its support schemes designed to create rural jobs. He was also concerned about the Regional Development Agencies being too urban focused, and that job creation in the countryside would suffer as a result.

The Countryside Commissions pre-merger remit was to promote the conservation and enhancement of the English countryside, while the RDCs original remit – apart from job creation – was to advise the Secretary of State upon all matters relating to the economic and social development of rural areas.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus