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SHOW BRIEFS

5 July 2002

SHOW BRIEFS

&#8226 MILK producers can increase the chance of cows conceiving a heifer calf with a special offer from Merial Animal Health and Cogent. Merial says that using Eprinex Pour-on to reduce worm burdens in milking cows can improve the chance of holding to service and with Cogents Sexed Advantage semen, resulting calves will be heifers. Producers buying five litres of Eprinex Pour-on will receive £100 off 10 straws of sexed semen.

&#8226 AN increase in daily milk yields of between two and three litres a cow has convinced this years Genus Silage Challenge winner of the value of using Powerstart. Carwyn Jones, of Llanalli, south Wales also attributes a reduction in calving index by 10 days and a rise in milk protein from 2.9% to 3.3% to the improved silage quality which has come from using Powerstart.

&#8226 THE National Beef Association believes government led plans to add environmental standards to farm assurance schemes will hamper efforts to build scheme membership. Robert Forster said schemes were still light on breeding members, including dairy farms, and cattle would soon have to spend 180 days on assured farms to qualify for premiums, rushing in new standards would slow recruitment rate. &#42

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SHOW BRIEFS

31 May 2002

SHOW BRIEFS

&#8226 A NEW Italian ryegrass variety, Alamo was the highest yielding variety in NIAB trials, producing 0.4t/ha (1t/acre) more silage than the control variety at first cut, according to Oliver Seeds which markets the variety. The variety also maintains a high digestibility well into the grazing season and is persistent it added . "Mean ground cover of this variety after 3.5 years is more than 40% compared with less than 20% for other Italian ryegrass varieties."

&#8226 BRITISH Seed Houses and David Bell Seeds launched a new technical leaflet, on Aber white clover varieties, bred by IGER at last weeks Grassland 2002 event. The leaflet summarises how varieties are mixed together to form a range of white clover blends, said British Seed Houses director Paul Billings. "On most farms, environmental and management systems can vary from year to year. Blends of Aber white clovers offer greater stability of yield than single varieties." &#42

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SHOW BRIEFS

9 July 1999

SHOW BRIEFS

&#8226 SHOPPERS push animal welfare considerations to the back of their minds when filling their trolleys, according to a new survey by the RSPCAs Freedom Food.

The survey, conducted by NOP at the end of June, found that although more than three-quarters of UK consumers claim to be concerned about farm animal welfare, 41% of the 1000 people questioned admitted they found the subject too upsetting to contemplate while out shopping.

&#8226 A NEW service for internet users which gives details of MAFFs animal welfare policies was launched at the show by junior farm minister Elliot Morley.

Part of the ministrys website (www.maff.gov.uk), the new section offers details of farm animal welfare policy. Readers messages can also be emailed back to MAFF.

"There is huge public interest in animal welfare issues. This is reflected in the amount of correspondence we receive," Mr Morley said. &#42

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SHOW BRIEFS

9 July 1999

SHOW BRIEFS

uIT could be 10 years before a vaccine against TB is available for use in the field, director of the Institute of Animal Health, Chris Bostock, told visitors to the Royal Show. "The TB bacterium is very complicated. The BCG vaccine used in humans does not work in cattle and we are trying to understand why as part of the vaccine development process."

uTHE Farm Energy Centre has launched a booklet on dealing with a power failure. Costing £1.50, it covers the actions to take to ensure continued safe operation of all critical farming operations, and steps required to have power restored quickly. It is available from the FEC (024-7669 6512). &#42

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SHOW BRIEFS

29 September 1995

SHOW BRIEFS

THE British Charolais Society scooped the Trehane competition for the second successive year. Second place went to the British Belgian Blue Society, followed by the Blonde dAquitaine Breeders Society in third.

The competition aims to promote the economic importance of beef in dairy herds.

The Prince Philip Award for the most practical and relevant technical demonstration was won by Kingshay Farming Trust.

FATHER and daughter Hubert and Shiela Tinkler from Lower Dene Farm, Nesfield, West Yorks, are the ADAS 1995 National Milk Cheque Managers of the Year.

Their 93-cow herd is one of the first NMR Yorkshire herds to break the 10,000kg barrier, with a rolling average of 10,300kg milk/cow for the year ending Sept 1995. The margin over purchased feed stands at £1700 a cow.

NATIONAL winner of the first Genus Mastitis Manager of the Year Award is Cumbrian producer Joseph Watson who collects £200 worth of dairy chemicals. He runs 70 milkers on 81ha (200-acre) Brunstock Farm, Brunstock, Carlisle.

FORMER Seale-Hayne student Jake Freestone was presented with the RABDF/Barclays Bank Dairy Student award.

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SHOW BRIEFS

7 July 1995

SHOW BRIEFS

THE average gross margin achieved by Meat and Livestock Commission monitored lowland sheep flocks last year was £1.20 down on 1993, though lamb sales were worth £3.30 more.

The drop in performance was mainly the result of increased feed and forage costs – £16.40 compared with £14.30.

"Producers have taken their eyes off the ball," said David Croston, MLCs sheep strategy manager.

" At the end of the day success still depends on producing what the market wants and being efficient in doing it. After the doom and gloom felt in the sheep industry in 1992, producers pulled their horns in and looked at costs. But then lamb prices improved they slackened off."

Replacement costs also soared from £7.50 in 1993 to £8.50 a ewe last year. Many producers held onto ewes early in the 1990s, as they were uncertain about their quota position, and producers needed to buy in new blood for aged flocks last year, explained Mr Croston.

"At the same time a strong lamb price means dearer ewes, even though it would be fair to say ewe quality has also improved – which in turn has increased lamb price through better conformation."

UK PIG producers should be exploiting the competitive advantage they have by increasing the slaughter weights of finished pigs.

Dr John Webb, director of genetics at Cotswold Pigs, Lincoln, urged producers to make better use of the biological and economical benefits gained from breeding.

"Pigs now grow leaner and faster, reducing the maintenance requirement. But lean growth is more economic at heavier weights as this is when they achieve their maximum feed intake."

Dr Webb also claimed that because a profitable carcass needed a high proportion of lean in valuable cuts, measuring using p2 back fat scores did not reflect its true value.

"The p2 gives the producer the wrong message," he said. "Ultrasonic techniques are available for accurate assessment of the carcass value."

INTEGRATED crop management need no longer confuse farmers, thanks to a new training pack from the British Agrochemicals Association, ATB-Landbase, LEAF and Sainsburys.

"We recognise there are a lot of people out there, both farmers and advisers, who have heard about ICM but who are finding it difficult to grasp the concept," commented Richard Trow-Smith of the BAA.

"For this reason we have developed this new pack to help college lecturers, ATB-Landbase trainers and other instructors as well as in-company training departments to explore the practical aspects of ICM."

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SHOW BRIEFS

7 July 1995

SHOW BRIEFS

POTATO production in former Soviet and east European countries is due a boost. SAC and export specialist M&M of Edin-burgh are producing ready-to-use outfits for generating disease-free seed. Cost is put at £240,000. Leasing options and annual servicing are likely to be an option.

ELITE arable training is on offer from Velcourt and Andersons. The course aims to develop strategies to respond to the changing pressures on the industry. Experts and Velcourt farms in the midlands are used to analyse and predict the likely consequences for businesses.

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