17 January 1996

Trade in sheep quota is quiet

WITH under three weeks left in which to trade sheep quota, a similar price pattern to last year is emerging.

Relatively plentiful supplies of GB lowland quota are meeting limited interest, putting sale and lease values under pressure. Less favoured area quota, however, is harder to find.

Richard Hyde of Sunderlands attributes the quiet demand for lowland samples to three factors:

&#8226 The anticipated fall in the sheep annual premium rate.

&#8226 Farmers reluctance to be tied into the retention period.

&#8226 Buoyant sheepmeat prices having encouraged the sale of stock.

Other traders agree, pointing to last years change to a single retention period ending on May 14, as having discouraged some from keeping sheep. Dairy farmers, who kept flying flocks, for example.

And certainly for lowland quota, there now seems little likelihood of values rising in the run-up to the close of trading.

Caroline Carr of Ian Potter Associates says the situation is not too different to last year, when lowland values tumbled as the trading period drew to a close.

Unlike last year, however, MAFF will allow transfer and lease forms to be submitted after premium claim forms, as long as both reach the ministry by Feb 4.

Sheep quota – typical values (Jan 13)

£/unit

LeaseSale

GB lowland211

English LFA1241

Welsh LFA935

Scottish LFA1036


Sheep quota – typical values (Jan 13)

£/unit

LeaseSale

GB lowland211

English LFA1241

Welsh LFA935

Scottish LFA1036