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WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

24 August 2001

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

The main aim of the farmers

weekly/PBIC Wheat Grower

Challenge is to find growers

who are making the most of

their wheat. Peter Grimshaw

reports on this years runner

up from near Kelso

ENTHUSIASM is the key ingredient in David Fuller-Shapcotts wheat production strategy.

Against the established pattern in a good malting barley-growing area he is a milling wheat enthusiast.

He is a dedicated user of slow-release nitrogen, which he considers vital for grain-fill and milling quality, and his enthusiasm for cultivations has him doing all the ploughing and drilling.

Wheats averaged 9.4t/ha (3.8t/acre) last year, over-topping the 10-year average of 9.1t/ha (3.7t/acre). Target is 10t/ha for first and 9t/ha for second wheats.

He and his brother Stuart are fastidious about crop cleanliness on the 243ha (600-acre) farm, where the harvest programme is planned to give a good entry for the succeeding crop.

Rotation on the Whitsome series clay loam at Sweethope, near Kelso, Roxburghshire, is a break, two wheats, then a run of three barleys.

Malacca favoured

Malacca is favoured as the first wheat and Consort as the second, with Hyno Esta hybrid being tried as an alternative second wheat.

Concentration on milling wheat is justified by a local niche market, says Mr Fuller-Shapcott. A slightly lower yield also reduces the strain on grain handling and conditioning facilities.

All the work, including combining, is done by Mr Fuller-Shapcott and his brother. After ploughing, with the all-important furrow press, they follow up with a 4m power-harrow combination and Nordsten 5040 drill.

On land with a relatively tender soil structure, dual wheels are used for all fieldwork, and the aim is to complete autumn sowing before September is out. In autumn 2000 it was Nov 1 before everything was drilled up, and this years crops suffered as a result.

"We select varieties for their maturity dates, and almost everything gets pre-harvest Roundup. It is about the cheapest form of drying, at todays diesel prices."

Seed rate is determined after checking thousand-grain weight, starting with 200/sq m and rising, if necessary, to 350/sq m, with a target of 640 fertile tillers/sq m.

Slugs pose the biggest threat to establishment, especially following a winter oilseed rape break, when a double-barrel approach is used, with half-rate mini-pellets applied to the OSR stubble a week before ploughing. Wheats are also routinely treated with half-rate mini-pellets and half-rate Genesis (thiodicarb) or similar after rolling.

Some seed was dressed with Secur (imidacloprid) last year, more to control slugs than aphids. The aim for the coming autumn is to drill first wheats even earlier to get the crop away before slugs get going.

Autumn weed control consists of IPU for grasses and "something cheap" to suit whatever broad-leaved weeds are present. This may be tank mixed with cypermethrin to hit aphids, a mixture that was applied on Nov 20 last year.

Growth regulator

Keeping crops standing is essential. Growth regulator applied to Abbot last year was 0.31 litres/ha of Moddus (trinexapac-ethyl) with 1.3 litres/ha of chlormequat, applied with 1 litre Mancuflo (copper and manganese) on May 28.

The aim of disease control is to keep crops squeaky clean, starting with T1 mildew and Septoria tritici control using a triazole, sometimes in tandem with a morpholine product to control mildew. Foil (fluquinconazole + prochloraz) was used this season. Ensign (fenpropimorph + kresoxim-methyl) plus Eclipse (epoxiconazole + fenpropimorph) follows at T2.

The T3 treatment for milling wheats is a strobilurin/triazole combination. Amistar (azoxystrobin) is the primary ingredient, with either Plover (difenoconazole) or Folicur (tebuconazole).

For soft wheats, Amistar is combined with a cheaper triazole. Malacca gets a robust strobilurin-based programme to keep it green and prevent a clash with barley combining and Twist (trifloxystrobin) at 1.44 litres/ha at T2 in the first week of June.

Mr Fuller-Shapcott follows Scottish Agricultural College crop nutrition guidelines, but modifies these after considering potential yield, previous experience and "a small insurance element."

Phosphate indices of three have allowed him to pare P applications, while potash levels are intended to replace straw losses only. Copper and manganese may also be applied at GS30, according to tissue analysis.

Following his own trials at the suggestion of his agronomist, Frank Lynch, Mr Fuller-Shapcott is convinced of the value of liquid, slow-release nitrogen applications including high levels of sulphur. The sulphur may also have a fungicidal effect, he reasons.

Applied in the form of nitrous ammonium sulphate (8N:0:0:9S) at GS36, he considers that leaching is almost eliminated, when applied by a contractor in late April at 1800 litres/ha.

"At the moment I am convinced liquid fertiliser is the key to milling wheat, mainly because it does not leach, and is still having an effect well into flag leaf. The downside is the relatively high volume of water involved." The liquid N is topped up with Nitram towards the end of May (GS39).

First wheats are dried to 14% mc and conditioned in ventilated bins. Second wheats are floor-stored and usually shifted from the farm first, with clearance by the end of January. Hard wheats follow in early spring, all having been sold forward on contract. Mr Fuller-Shapcott likes to exploit several different contracts, including option and managed funds.

Last years Challenge crop of first wheat Abbot yielded 10t/ha and sold for £82/t at 13.63% protein and 265 Hagberg. Total variable costs were £291.59/ha (£118/acre), giving a gross margin before subsidy of £528.41/ha (£213.85/acre).

The second wheat Consort did 8.9t/ha (3.6t/acre) at £65/t, with variable costs of £261.86 to give a gross margin before subsidy of £316.64 (£128.14/acre). &#42

Making the most of milling wheat in an area otherwise dominated by malting barley and a keen eye for management detail marked Kelso grower David Fuller-Shapcott out as a competition finalist.

FULLER-SHAPCOTT AIMS

&#8226 Tailored crop for assured market.

&#8226 10-12t/ha for first wheats.

&#8226 Boost second wheats, maybe by using hybrids.

&#8226 Earlier sown first wheats to avoid slug damage.

&#8226 Clean, disease-free crop.

&#8226 Careful harvest and storage to ensure marketability.

    Read more on:
  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

17 August 2001

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

A thorough knowledge of

crops and use of

appropriate inputs is the

winning recipe in the

farmers weekly/PBIC Seeds

Wheat Grower Challenge.

Peter Grimshaw reports

Finalists hard to separate

BOTH finalists in the competition have won praise from the judging panel, farmers weeklys Charles Abel, Geoff Hall of PBIC/Monsanto and Brendan OConnor of ADAS.

Deciding which of the two, one from East Yorkshire the other from the Scottish Borders, should win was particularly hard, given their dissimilar management needs.

Winner David Hinchliffes untiring attention to detail and confidence in what he does at Hinchliffe Farms, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorks is especially notable, says Mr Hall.

"He understands his wheat crop completely. Field walking is a part of his life; and his BASIS qualifications combined with intimate knowledge and experience of his farm allow him to fine-tune inputs."

In spite of a seriously delayed sowing programme last autumn and waterlogging for much of winter and spring, Mr Hinchliffes well tailored management produced outstanding crops as harvest approached.

He made careful cuts in fungicide doses appropriate to the season, given the relatively reduced disease pressure.

Runner-up David Fuller-Shapcott from Kelso followed a full treatment programme throughout and his crops going into harvest looked very clean.

Leeds-based Mr OConnor says that given the very difficult conditions it was fortunate for everyone, including Challenge finalists, that well-spaced wet and dry periods throughout the season allowed crops to catch up.

"Most people would say their crops improved as the season went on, with prospects of yields much higher than they expected in spring. Recent sunshine has been good news for some crops, and many have improved substantially, but only those which rooted well. Sunshine cant produce yield if roots cant find water."

It is pleasing to note that both finalists are strongly focused on growing for their specific markets, says PBIC cereals product manager John Howie. "This is a primary aim of the challenge."

    Read more on:
  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

17 August 2001

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

A thorough knowledge of

crops and use of

appropriate inputs is the

winning recipe in the

farmers weekly/PBIC Seeds

Wheat Grower Challenge.

Peter Grimshaw reports

Finalists hard to separate

BOTH finalists in the competition have won praise from the judging panel, farmers weeklys Charles Abel, Geoff Hall of PBIC/Monsanto and Brendan OConnor of ADAS.

Deciding which of the two, one from East Yorkshire the other from the Scottish Borders, should win was particularly hard, given their dissimilar management needs.

Winner David Hinchliffes untiring attention to detail and confidence in what he does at Hinchliffe Farms, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorks is especially notable, says Mr Hall.

"He understands his wheat crop completely. Field walking is a part of his life; and his BASIS qualifications combined with intimate knowledge and experience of his farm allow him to fine-tune inputs."

In spite of a seriously delayed sowing programme last autumn and waterlogging for much of winter and spring, Mr Hinchliffes well tailored management produced outstanding crops as harvest approached.

He made careful cuts in fungicide doses appropriate to the season, given the relatively reduced disease pressure.

Runner-up David Fuller-Shapcott from Kelso followed a full treatment programme throughout and his crops going into harvest looked very clean.

Leeds-based Mr OConnor says that given the very difficult conditions it was fortunate for everyone, including Challenge finalists, that well-spaced wet and dry periods throughout the season allowed crops to catch up.

"Most people would say their crops improved as the season went on, with prospects of yields much higher than they expected in spring. Recent sunshine has been good news for some crops, and many have improved substantially, but only those which rooted well. Sunshine cant produce yield if roots cant find water."

It is pleasing to note that both finalists are strongly focused on growing for their specific markets, says PBIC cereals product manager John Howie. "This is a primary aim of the challenge."

    Read more on:
  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

17 August 2001

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

Two difficult seasons in

succession have tested cereal

growers resources to the

extreme. Peter Grimshaw

reports on the winner of the

farmers weekly/PBIC Wheat

Grower Challenge 2001

RAPID and deft response to crop needs and maximising every input pays for David and James Hinchliffe, whose family farming partnership at Hinchliffe Farms, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorks totals 475ha (1174 acres).

Each field is treated individually, based on constant observation. Both brothers are FACTS qualified, members of the BASIS Professional Register and former qualified seed crop inspectors and licensed seed samplers, as well as Arable Research Centre members.

They are their own agronomists, and buy inputs on tender. The farm also hosts trial sites for BASF, Cropwise and Woodhead Seeds. It gained BASIS/LEAF certification for integrated crop management in 1998, and that is the approach underpinning environmental policy.

David Hinchliffe, the winner of the FW/PBIC Wheat Grower Challenge 2001, sees it as his job to ensure harvest fulfills the innate promise of the original seed. "It has its full potential when sown. Everything happening after that reduces potential yield."

Canopy control

The aim is 600 fertile tillers/sq m and a disease-free crop canopy. Heavier land must be drilled by mid-September, starting with first wheats at 200 seeds/sq m (based on 1000 grain weight), or possibly fewer in particularly favourable conditions. Canopy management starts at drilling, says Mr Hinchliffe. "What you have got in spring is what you are stuck with."

Weather is the most potent subsequent factor, he believes, although delayed N may help. PGR is used with caution. "If its cold, you have wasted your time."

Moddus (trinexapac-ethyl + chlormequat) may be used at low dose, later rather than earlier, to shorten straw and reduce the leverage effect of a filling head under wet, windy conditions.

The water-retentive, low-lying, level farm at Rawcliffe Bridge is in a single 325ha (803-acre) block and mainly Grade 1 warp. About five miles away, the rest is Grade 2 heavy clay.

Average rainfall is 570mm (22.5in) and the exposed area notches up some of Englands highest wind speeds, so transpiration rates are high.

Three generations of the family have established a reputation for cereal seed production. Commercial and seed wheat cropping accounts for around half a rotation, consisting typically of one or two wheats, followed by oilseed rape on the heavier land or spring breaks of peas, beans, linseed, linola or borage.

Mainstay variety for 2001 harvest is Consort, chosen for reliability and marketability. Charger does well in the second wheat slot, and because it stands best when sown later it fits the autumn workload. Claire is grown as a companion variety to Consort.

Target yields are 11t/ha (4.5t/acre) for first wheats – although 12t/ha (4.9t/acre) has been recorded in recent harvests – and 10t/ha (4t/acre) for second wheats.

The need to incorporate straw before second wheats means ploughing is most likely on the heaviest land, although different drilling systems are being compared in pursuit of reduced tillage wherever possible.

Indices of 2-3 for P & K mean top-up applications, based on an offtake/input balance sheet, can go on when convenient rather than to meet immediate crop needs. RB209 guidelines are followed throughout, with a four-yearly soil sample. High pH results in some P lock-up.

Nitrogen applications are based on position in the rotation, estimated crop potential equated with lodging risk, and an assessment of the impact of winter rainfall on residual soil nitrogen calculations. Typically, first wheats receive 200kg/ha, of nitrogen and second wheats 240kg/ha, timed to ensure benefits go to grain, not straw – mid-March for 30kg/ha on first wheats, perhaps double that on second crops. The 10-15 days in mid-April are judged the critical timing for the remaining N.

On a generally clean and pest-free farm, chemical savings can be made. Herbicide resistant blackgrass is the main weed on the heavy land. Standard approach is to use Avadex (tri-allate), followed by Hawk (clodinafop-propargyl + trifluralin) + Lexus (flupyrsulfuron-methyl), using fine spray nozzles, with care.

Few weed worries

The warpland has no major grass weed problem and no difficult broad-leaved weeds, cleavers in particular having been almost eliminated after many years of "zero tolerance" in seed crops.

A "totally reactive" approach to disease control is based on three-applications, at growth stages 31-32, 37-39 and 59, although each field is treated individually. The mix of products reflects crop variety and presumed need, with one eye constantly upon preventing resistance build-up by swapping tank mixed products.

From their own trials over the past four seasons, it appears that strobilurins may not always yield a profitable return on the warp land, provided crops have been kept clean by other means.

Pest control is generally confined to autumn aphid control and keeping on top of slugs with half-rate pellets applied to the stale seed-bed on the heaviest ground. &#42

Bank House Farm

Seed wheat gross (£/ha)

margin 2000

Basic seed 61.39

Fertiliser 74.63

Herbicide 19.54

Fungicide 48.54

Insecticide 3.20

Total costs 207.30

Output 10.5t/ha 756

C2 seed

Area aid 260

Gross return 1,016

Gross margin 808.70

Hinchliffe aims

A key goal is to develop systems of establishment that complement the farms soil type. Minimum tillage clearly resulted in drier over-winter and spring conditions than areas ploughed last autumn. The family plans to continue producing higher-yielding, highly marketable crops at least cost, but within best environmental practice. They are confident that can be achieved and that they will be able to compete with wheat growers anywhere in the world. A looming problem is mycotoxins in grain, says Mr Hinchliffe. "We need serious research on this. I am more worried about a public scare than by any EU limits."

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  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

30 March 2001

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

ARE you a dab hand at growing wheat? If you know which variety to grow for which market and how to match sowing rate to variety, seed-bed and drilling date then why not try your hand at our Wheat Grower Challenge?

All you need do is correctly answer the questions on the coupon and you could soon be well on your way towards winning the top prize of a study/holiday trip to Portugal for you and your partner next winter. Closing date is April 20 – so why not put pen to paper now?

Organised by farmers weekly and sponsored by major UK breeder PBIC Seeds the aim of the competition is to identify and promote best practice in cereal production.

A high yield is not the sole criteria. Instead, we are looking for a clear understanding of the processes involved in growing a top cereal crop and an awareness of market needs, plus an appreciation of environmental issues and careful control of inputs and overheads.

Entrants who successfully complete the questionnaire stage of the competition will enter a round of more detailed judging, from which a short-list of three finalists will be chosen.

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE 2001 – ENTRY FORM

Tick correct answer

1 Which quality of UK wheats has the widest market potential?

A Group 1 o B Group 2 o C Group 3 o

2 At what growth stage does leaf three emerge in a late-November sown wheat crop?

A GS 31 o B GS 32 o C GS 33 o

3 Which varietal characteristic is most important for early drilling?

A Mildew resistant o B Low tillering o C Slow development o

4 How much of the UK wheat crop is typically exported?

A 15% o B 25% o C 35% o

5 Which break crop gives the best gross margin potential for the following wheat?

A OSR o B Peas o C Beans o

Name……………………………………………………………………………………………

Address………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………… Post Code……………………………….

Tel,…………………………………………. Fax…………………………………………

Send to: Wheat Grower Challenge, farmers weekly, Quadrant House, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS. Fax 020-8652 4005. Closing date Fri Apr 20, 2001.

Win a study/holiday trip to Portugal

Finalists will be invited to a special awards presentation, where the winner will receive a glass trophy to keep and all finalists will receive a special framed certificate. The winner of the FW/PBIC Seeds Wheat Grower Challenge 2001 will also win a study/holiday trip to Portugal in the winter.

Sponsored by:

Wheats for markets

EFFECTIVE marketing has become as important as first class agronomy in modern wheat production. And effective marketing means choosing and growing wheats for the markets available to you rather than merely finding markets for the wheats you grow.

You may grow a consistent high protein Group 1 variety like Hereward favoured by all UK millers. You may go out-and-out for the feed market with a reliable trailer-filling Group 4 like Napier. You may opt for yield with biscuit-making potential through a Group 3 stalwart like Consort. Or you may keep your marketing options as wide as possible by choosing multi-purpose Group 2 varieties like Charger and Option for their combination of high yields and excellent baking qualities for export and home markets.

Whether you concentrate on relatively few varieties or keep your eggs in rather more baskets, the keys to success have to be threefold:

&#8226 establishing your best local market opportunities;

&#8226 selecting the most suitable varieties for these markets under your system; and,

&#8226 growing them in ways which meet the target market specifications as reliably and cost effectively as possible.

Thats why we are putting more emphasis than ever on these critical aspects of wheat growing in this years Challenge, hoping to share the experiences of growers who are truly at the forefront of modern wheat production.

READTHERULES

1 The competition is open to all bona-fide farmers and farm managers in the UK. One entry per farm.

2 Complete the entry form in ink and post or fax to the address on the coupon.

3 Closing date is Fri Apr 20, 2001.

4 Late, incomplete, mutilated and ineligible entries will be disqualified, as will any which do not comply with these rules. No responsibility will be accepted for entries delayed or lost in the post.

5 The judges will be appointed by farmers weekly and PBIC Seeds. Their decision will be final. No further correspondence will be entered into.

6 The winner and finalists will be invited to an awards presentation. They must agree to attend this and co-operate in subsequent publicity.

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  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

4 August 2000

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

Making the most of the

genetic potential in modern

wheat varieties is the goal of

all the finalists in the

farmers weekly/PBIC Seeds

Wheat Grower Challenge.

Here Charles Abel profiles

the second finalist, from

Herefordshire

AGRONOMY decisions are no problem for finalist Ben Davies. As well as managing the familys 220ha (543-acre) farm at Ross-on-Wye he works as a full-time agronomist for Oxfordshire firm Robertson Agriculture, part of the HL Hutchinson group.

As an example of diversification it works well. Mr Davies develops his agronomy skills, while two full-time workers carry out day-to-day operations at Townsend Farm, Brampton Abbotts, near Ross, as well as bringing in a healthy contracting income.

"Spraying and potato planting bring a useful income in the spring and more spraying and potato lifting generate further income in the autumn," Mr Davies says. That helps cover both labour and machinery over-heads.

Cropping is geared to maximise wheat output, a rotation of contract grown potatoes, two wheats, sugar beet and wheat replacing one which included peas and oilseed rape. "We dropped the combinable breaks because we did not have the storage, which meant we were selling them off the combine, which is far from ideal."

Establishment

Establishment is the main area of innovation, Mr Davies being keen to reduce seed-rates in-line with variety and sowing date. "Seed placement is critical. We tested four drills, the 3m Amazon Air-Star Profi combination was best by far."

Fitted with disc coulters to avoid blockages and working with a 3m Farmforce front press and Case MX135 fitted with large radial tyres it is used to place seed 2.7cm (1in) into a well consolidated seed-bed in early September to aid rooting and anchorage, moving to 1.2cm (0.5in) in November to speed emergence in cooler, wetter conditions.

Drilling follows the plough as close as possible to prevent land drying and causing a rough seed-bed in which residual herbicides may struggle.

Drilling dates and rates vary according to variety, thousand grain weight and target population. For example, Savannah with a tgw of 56g and a target population of 110 plants/sqm went in at 92kg/ha on Sept 15 last year. Field losses are also taken into account for each field.

Some Malacca was drilled on Aug 25. At the other extreme Hyno Esta restored hybrid wheat went in at 48kg/ha after beet and potatoes in November. Target population was 100 plants/sqm. Extra vigour ensured that was achieved and yield potential in July was on a par with September-drilled Savannah, Mr Davies estimates.

Most seed is farm-saved, Sibutol Secur (fuberidazole + bitertanol + imidacloprid) being used last year to combat BYDV in crops drilled before Sept 24. But low seed rates meant a foliar insecticide was still used.

Jockey (fluquinconazole + prochloraz) will be used on second wheats sown after Oct 15 this year. Slug traps are checked and Optimol (metaldehyde) applied as needed.

Variety choice includes Malacca in pursuit of a breadmaking premium, Shamrock in the hope that millers approve it and Savannah as a high yielding feed, although it will be dropped after its poor standing power caused problems in a late September sowing, which missed its first pgr this year.

Glyphosate is used to hit couch pre-harvest and pre-planting. Wild oats arriving in turkey muck are hand-rogued. Annual meadow-grass is best tackled with 2 litres/ha Stomp (pendimethalin), 8g/ha Lexus (flupyrsulfuron-methyl) and 1litre/ha Ardent (diflufenican + trifluralin). Just 0.75 litres/ha of Starane (fluroxypyr) was required in spring for cleavers and volunteer potatoes. Sterile brome is best controlled with ploughing.

No fungicide

Autumn foliar fungicide is not used, even after early drilling. "With the correct seed rate and establishment there is no need for fungicide, especially if mildew susceptible varieties are avoided," says Mr Davies.

In spring varietal disease ratings dictate spray mixes. Savannahs yellow rust and septoria vulnerability means Twist (trifloxystrobin) plus Alto (cyproconazole), Shamrocks brown rust weakness means Amistar (azoxystrobin) plus Foil (fluquinconazole + prochloraz), while Malaccas good all-round resistance favours Twist and Juggler (tetraconazole).

First application is earlier than the traditional GS32 timing. "We feel that strobilurin chemistry applied before the onset of any disease will still protect right through until flag leaf emergence."

Disease resistance in the hybrid wheat has been particularly impressive, one bout receiving no fungicide and staying green and relatively clean well into July. But missing out pgr left the area vulnerable to lodging, demonstrating the need for that input, Mr Davies notes.

Level seed-bed

Most land is ploughed to ensure a level seed-bed. "I would love a direct drill, but ruts left after potatoes and beet mean we would still need a plough and I cant justify both on 500 acres."

Liberal use of turkey manure pre-ploughing is allowed for when calculating nutrient inputs. Sulphur is increasingly necessary, as indicated by tissue testing. Nitrogen rates are being upped in second wheats to compensate for strobilurin use the previous year.

Harvesting uses a 1992 Class Dominator 78. "As long as we can get round at 15.5% moisture for a total cost of £23/ha we will keep it."

ACCS membership is shunned. "We have not yet found anybody who has stipulated assured crops," says Mr Davies. Until he does he will sit outside the scheme, but run stores to the same standards or better, in anticipation that he will have to become a member of the scheme in the future.

Environmental actions include careful product choice according to ICM principles, full LERAP compliance, correct waste disposal and plans to test a bio-bed for handling chemical washings.

Marketing is through a local independent trader who achieved £79/t for feed wheat last year. Pools are seen to offer no advantages.

Breeding developments, such as the new vigorous hybrids, look set to improve crop productivity and offer new market opportunities in future, Mr Davies concludes. &#42

Latest agronomy advcice is no problem at Townsend Farm, near Ross-on-Wye – Ben Davis is also a qualified agronomist working in Oxon.

BENDAVIES

Ross-on-Wye, Herefords.

&#8226 220ha, sandy loam/alluvial silt.

&#8226 10.2t/ha ave, £160/ha var costs.

&#8226 Malacca, Shamrock, Savannah, Hyno Esta.

&#8226 Feed/milling market mix.

&#8226 Hybrid wheat trial.

&#8226 Drill rate/date key.

&#8226 Muck and FSS cut costs.

&#8226 Not ACCS, not keen.

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  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

2 June 2000

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

ARE you a dab hand at growing wheat? If you know which variety to grow for which market and how to match sowing rate to variety, seed-bed and drilling date then why not try your hand at our Wheat Grower Challenge.

All you need to do is correctly answer the questions below and you could be well on your way to securing the top prize of 3t of new group 2 winter wheat Option worth over £1000. Closing date is June 16 – so why not put pen to paper now?

Organised by farmers weekly and sponsored by major UK breeder PBIC Seeds the aim of the competition is to identify and promote best practice in cereal production.

A high yield is not the sole criteria. We are looking for a clear understanding of the processes involved in growing a top cereal crop, as well as an awareness of market needs and environmental issues and careful control of inputs and overheads.

Entrants who successfully complete the questionnaire stage of the competition will enter a round of on-farm judging in early July.

To enter, answer the simple questions below. You could soon be well on your way to over £1000-worth of Option seed.

3t Optionseed prize

Finalists will be invited to the headquarters of PBIC Seeds in Cambridge, where the winner will receive a trophy to keep and all finalists will receive a special framed certificate. The winner of the FW/PBIC Seeds Wheat Grower Challenge will receive 3t of seed of the latest addition to the PBIC Seeds portfolio – the Group II variety Option –

worth over £1000.

Read the Rules

1) The competition is open to all bona-fide farmers and farm managers in the UK. One entry per person.

2) Complete the entry form in ink and post or fax to the address on the coupon.

3) Closing date is Jun 16, 2000.

4) Late, incomplete, mutilated and ineligible entries will be disqualified, as will any which do not comply with these rules. No responsibility will be accepted for entries delayed or lost in the post.

5) The judges will be appointed by farmers weekly and PBIC Seeds. Their decision will be final. No further correspondence will be entered into.

6) The winner and finalists will be announced and presentations made at PBIC Seeds, Cambridge. Entrants must agree to attend the event and co-operate in subsequent publicity.

Sponsors message

To be a successful wheat grower requires a multitude of skills, ranging from good farm practice and husbandry to planning and marketing. PBIC Seeds is delighted to sponsor this farmers weekly initiative. We believe it will give further recognition to the skills and knowledge required to be a successful wheat grower in todays testing farming environment.

By targeting the market, whether it be for human consumption, animal feed or export, growers can meet market demands to maximise margin. Successful wheat businesses rely on selecting the right variety for the intended market, using appropriate husbandry to optimise inputs, and combining that variety knowledge with the latest farming techniques such as reduced tillage or harvest management to manage fixed costs. PBIC Seeds is dedicated to supporting farmers efforts by supplying varieties across the wide range of end uses, backed up by technical and agronomic information to help make the appropriate choices for the market place. PBIC Seeds looks forward to meeting the winner of the Wheat Grower Challenge 2000.

The first 100 entries will receive

a free Napier screen saver and

the latest agronomic information

on the PBIC Seeds portfolio.

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

Questions [tick correct answer]

1 How many brome plants/sq m will reduce yield by 1t/ha ?

A 5 [ ] B 50 [ ] C 100 [ ]

2 Which quality of UK wheats has the highest export potential for use in bread making and blended flours ?

A Group 1 [ ] B Group 2 [ ] C Group 3 [ ]

3 Which factor has most significant effect on severity of take-all ?

A Nitrogen rate [ ] B Seed rate [ ] C Drill date [ ]

4 Which varietal characteristic is most important for early drilling ?

A Slow development [ ] B Low tillering [ ] C Mildew Resistant [ ]

5 What is the size of the UK feed wheat market?

A 3Mt [ ] B 4Mt [ ] C 6Mt [ ]

6 What is the average time saving achieved using minimal tillage rather than ploughing?

A 15% [ ] B 35% [ ] C 50% [ ]

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  • News

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

7 May 1999

WHEAT GROWER CHALLENGE

IF you know which variety to grow for which market and how to match sowing rate to variety, seed-bed and drilling date then it could well pay you to try your hand at our Wheat Grower Challenge.

If you can correctly answer the questions below you could be well on your way to securing the top prize of a cheque for £1000. And for the first 20 entries received there are free tickets to the national combinable crops event, Cereals 99, worth £7.50 each. Closing date is May 28 – so why not put pen to paper now?

Organised by farmers weekly and sponsored by major UK breeder PBI Cambridge the aim of the competition is to identify and promote best practice in cereal production.

A high yield is not the sole criteria. We are looking for a clear understanding of the processes involved in growing a top cereal crop, as well as an awareness of market needs and environmental issues and careful control of inputs and overheads.

Entrants who successfully complete the questionnaire stage of the competition will enter a round of on-farm judging in early July.

To enter, answer the simple questions below. You could soon be well on your way to being £1000 the richer for it.

Sponsors message

To be a successful wheat grower requires a multitude of skills ranging from good farm practice and husbandry to planning and marketing.

The demands placed on farmers are constantly changing and the challenge is to meet those demands while continuing the inherent farming ethos.

PBI Cambridge is delighted to sponsor this farmers weekly initiative. We believe it will give further recognition to Britains best and to the importance of their knowledge.

Key to farming success is understanding end-user requirements. By targeting the market, whether it be for human consumption, animal feed or export, growers can meet market demands and make that all-important gross margin. This can be achieved by selecting the right variety for the intended market and using the appropriate husbandry to optimise the inputs.

PBI Cambridge is dedicated to supporting farmers efforts by supplying varieties across the wide range of end users, backed up by technical and agronomic information to help make the appropriate choices for the market-place.

PBI Cambridge looks forward to meeting the Wheat Grower of the Year.

£1000

TOP PRIZE

The winner will be presented with a cheque for £1000 and a trophy to keep. All finalists will be invited to an expenses paid awards presentation and lunch at the headquarters of PBI Cambridge in Cambridge. Finalists will also receive a special framed certificate.

1) The competition is open to all bone fide farmers and farm managers in the UK. One entry per person.

2) Complete the entry form in ink and post or fax to the address on the coupon.

3) Closing date is May 28, 1999.

4) Late, incomplete, mutilated and ineligible entries will be disqualified, as will any which do not comply with these rules. No responsibility will be accepted for entries delayed or lost in the post.

5) The judges will be appointed by FARMERS WEEKLY and

PBI Cambridge. Their decision will

be final. No further correspondence will be entered into.

6) The winner and finalists will

be announced and presentations made at a special lunch reception at PBI Cambridge, Cambridge. Entrants must agree to attend the event and co-operate in subsequent publicity.

WHEAT CHALLENGE ENTRY FORM

Name……………………………………………………………………………………………

Address………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………..Postcode………………………….

Phone …………………………………….. Fax …………………………………………….

Farm size ………………………………… Wheat area ………………………………….

Typical yields ………………………………………………………………………………..

Typical quality ……………………………………………………………………………….

Q1 What is the most likely cause of floppy, mottled green leaves, with tips

still green.

a) manganese deficiency b) magnesium deficiency c) BYDV

Q2 What is the pre-harvest target for tiller numbers in w wheat?

a) 300/sq m b) 600/sqm c) 900/sqm

Q3 What is the main cause of low Hagbergs?

a) excess nitrogen b) cold weather c) grain sprouting

Q4 Which weed causes most yield loss per plant?

a) chickweed b) wild oat c) poppy

Q5 What grain type best suits biscuit production?

a) soft b) hard c) either

Q6 How much wheat yield usually comes from the flag leaf?

a) 20% b) 30% c) 45%

Q7 How much rain is needed to spread Septoria disease up a cereal plant?

a) 10mm b) 1mm c) dew

Send to: Cereal Grower Challenge, farmers weekly, Quadrant House, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS. Fax: 0181-652 4005. Closing date Fri, May 28 1999.

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