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Young people in farming

8 January 2001
Young people in farming

OTHER businesses outside farming have access to government loan guarantees, backed by the local enterprise companies, when startup business cannot get finance through normal channels because of lack of personal finance or colatteral.

These are administered by the banks and apply to well thought-out new business startups.

This loan guarantee is not available to agriculture.

The only way into farming for young people is to rent or contract farmland; however, banks very rarely give loans for the working capital needed due to the lack of assets even though the venture is profitable.

The government should look at reinstating this loan guarantee to young businessmen looking to start new farm businesses.

Many of the brightest young people are heading to other businesses due to the essentially high capital costs of machinery, land, quota etc, and when they can rent or lease these items there is no finance available.
Lisa Gwynne, Muirhead, Cupar
mayrock@farmersweekly.net

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Young people in farming

7 December 1999
Young people in farming

IT is the end of an era.

Like many others, my brother and I look like being the first of a family without even the opportunity to go into farming.

My brother is now extremely happy, successful in his job selling insurance, but while I have been studying a degree in a non-farming area so that I can be assured of a job at the end of it, the prospect of never being involved with farming does not bear thinking about.

As many others who have done this have no doubt found, without previous experience, the chances of work are not great, but I have tried offering to work for free to gain some sort of useful experience – and even here I have not been successful.

The hard fact is that farmers today – unlike my father and those before him – have an impossible job on their hands just trying to make enough money to maintain a farm and feed their families, leaving no free time or resources to train and support the next generation of farmers.

Until their situation eases they can not be expected to help those just starting out.

Therefore I hope things get better for all you guys because in the end, sad as it is, it comes down to earning money and as much as I want to be involved with farming, time is running out and I will soon have to start looking towards jobs where at least I can get experience and go on to earn a living.

If there are any small farm owners out there, especially in the Oswestry or Shropshire area who could use a free extra pair of hands for a while then please let me know.

Otherwise I wish you all good luck for the future.

  • David Lawson, Oswestry, Shropshire Email: D.M.Lawson-97@student.lboro.ac.uk

    • Read more on:
    • News

    Young people in farming

    7 December 1999
    Young people in farming

    IT is the end of an era.

    Like many others, my brother and I look like being the first of a family without even the opportunity to go into farming.

    My brother is now extremely happy, successful in his job selling insurance, but while I have been studying a degree in a non-farming area so that I can be assured of a job at the end of it, the prospect of never being involved with farming does not bear thinking about.

    As many others who have done this have no doubt found, without previous experience, the chances of work are not great, but I have tried offering to work for free to gain some sort of useful experience – and even here I have not been successful.

    The hard fact is that farmers today – unlike my father and those before him – have an impossible job on their hands just trying to make enough money to maintain a farm and feed their families, leaving no free time or resources to train and support the next generation of farmers.

    Until their situation eases they can not be expected to help those just starting out.

    Therefore I hope things get better for all you guys because in the end, sad as it is, it comes down to earning money and as much as I want to be involved with farming, time is running out and I will soon have to start looking towards jobs where at least I can get experience and go on to earn a living.

    If there are any small farm owners out there, especially in the Oswestry or Shropshire area who could use a free extra pair of hands for a while then please let me know.

    Otherwise I wish you all good luck for the future.

  • David Lawson, Oswestry, Shropshire Email: D.M.Lawson-97@student.lboro.ac.uk


    • Read more on:
    • News
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