Mains Of Rhynie ( Lot 1), Rhynie, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, AB54

£2,450,000 - SALE

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Mains Of Rhynie ( Lot 1), Rhynie, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, AB54
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Savills Rural
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Savills Rural
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Mains Of Rhynie ( Lot 1), Rhynie, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, AB54
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02074998644
Savills Rural

Description

Mains of Rhynie boasts many attributes.

The farm is particularly private with the farmhouse and farm buildings sitting in a natural hollow at the end of a long private tree lined road, centrally situated and surrounded by its own farmland. The natural contours of the farm enhance its appeal and give rise to further increase the amenity and sporting potential with tree planting or seasonal game crops.

Over the past three years there has been significant investment in the fabric of the farm – refurbishing/upgrading the farmhouse, erecting new farm buildings and fences and improving the soil structure and fertility.

Considerable potential exists to utilise the natural resources on the farm. Planning consent for the erection of three wind turbines has been approved on the higher ground which could generate diversified income.

Location

Mains of Rhynie is situated due south of the market town of Huntly in the county of Aberdeenshire in the north east of Scotland. The Strathbogie area lies in land away from the sea protected by the surrounding rolling hills in an area well known for its productive mixed farms. The hinterland around Aberdeen has benefitted much from the oil industry over the last 20 years with a heavy investment in new housing and transport links. However, the rural landscape remains largely unchanged, with the exception of wind turbines which are dotted around the local area, where the focus remains very much on food production.

Mains of Rhynie lies one mile south of the village of Rhynie in a particularly attractive scenic countryside. The local village which boasts a primary school and parish church sits below “Tap o Noth”, a local landmark which rises to 1,848 m of glorious purple in the late summer months. The Correen and Ladder Hills lie further to the south and give rise to the grouse moors of Aberdeenshire. Beyond on Speyside lies the “Distillery Trail” which attracts visitors to the area keen to sample the blend of highland water and Spring Barley for which the area is famed.

The town of Huntly with its historic castle is a busy local centre offering a choice of supermarket, post office, banking and professional services, secondary schooling and swimming pool. Additional leisure facilities are available in both Insch (11 miles) and Alford (12 miles) with golf courses in the immediate vicinity at Huntly and Insch which both also have rail stations providing a regular service to Aberdeen and Inverness. Aberdeen Airport at Dyce (32 miles) offers daily domestic services to some of the major cities in the UK and Europe.

Aberdeen is a vibrant city with its corporate headquarters, universities and colleges and provides all the services expected of a major city. Private schools include Robert Gordon’s College, the Hamilton School, St Margaret’s and The Albyn as well as the newly built International School of Aberdeen. The farm is also well placed for easy access to Gordonstoun (private co-educational) which lies 42 miles to the north west.

Inverurie (22 miles) offers an alternative to Huntly and has a number of individual specialist shops as well as Thainstone Agricultural Centre with its weekly livestock mart. The area is particularly well served by agricultural dealers and support services.

The county of Aberdeenshire offers extensive opportunities for field sports, driven pheasant and partridges, walked up days, grouse shooting and stalking with fishing on the Rivers Dee, Don, Deveron and Ythan. Winter sports enthusiasts can ski at Aviemore and The Lecht when conditions are favourable.

Description

FARMHOUSE

Mains of Rhynie Farmhouse is constructed of stone under a slate roof and enjoys a sheltered setting surrounded by open woodland close to but set away from the farm steading. The residential element of the farm is contained within a stone wall with its own driveway and gravel parking area to the side. The garden is laid predominantly to lawns and extends into a wooded area of mature hardwood trees which is gradually being incorporated into the area under management. A small burn (stream) runs through and could be contained to create a water feature to encourage wildlife.

The farmhouse, which has oil fired central heating (new system and boiler installed 2014) and hardwood double glazing throughout, is a spacious and comfortable family home with accommodation on two floors as shown on the floor plans.

The Sitting Room lies off the Entrance Hall and enjoys a triple aspect making it a light a spacious room efficiently heated by a new wood burning stove. The Dining Room and Study/Office lie opposite with a large open plan kitchen and family room beyond. The kitchen has windows to the north and south with a glazed door leading directly out onto the south side of the house. The fitted wall and floor units form a functional working space with integrated applicances (Samsung double oven and electric induction hob, dishwasher, washing machine and tumble dryer). A sizeable kitchen table can be positioned in front of the open fireplace on the far wall.

Stairs lead up to a split landing off which a master bedroom suite has been created with en suite shower-room. There are three further bedrooms and a sizeable bathroom with free standing bath and separate power shower. A boxroom provides access up to the floored attic which benefits from three velux windows.

There is a sizeable basement accessed externally which provides ideal dry storage space.

FARM BUILDINGS

Centrally located within the farm lies an excellent range of modern and traditional farm buildings. The current owners have invested significantly in the farm buildings at Mains of Rhynie taking down the majority of the traditional steading range and replacing it with buildings of a scale and suitable for modern farming practices.

1. General Purpose Shed (35.5m x 22.7m) – Steel portal frame construction, concrete floor, concrete panel walls to 3m, profile sheet cladding and a fibre cement roof. 6m eaves. 2 electric roller shutter doors. The building is currently used for machinery storage and grain storage.

2. General Purpose Shed (35.5m x 13.7m) – Steel portal frame, concrete floor, box profile roof. There is concrete panel walling on the eastern end of the shed to hold wet grain.

3. Cattle Court (30.2m x 27.5m) – Concrete portal frame shed with lean-to either side; , concrete floor, corrugated cladding and roof.

4. Traditional Steading (26m x 4.3m) + (19.3m x 5.95m) – A traditional L shaped steading range of stone construction under a pitched slate roof. Concrete floor. Roller shutter door. Timber lean to (22m x 4.1m). Currently used for storage.

5. Dutch Barn (51.66m x 6.96m) – Steel truss construction. Hardcore roof. Corrugated tin roof and cladding.

There is a former mill Pond to the west of the farm buildings with a lade running down through the farm steading and wooded area behind the farmhouse.

THE LAND

The land at Mains of Rhynie forms one contiguous block with only one field not being accessible from the central core. The majority of the land is Grade 3 (2) and is mostly stone free. The land lies between 190m and 323m at the top of Quarry Hill.

The soils are a mix of sandy silt loams, silty loams and clay and are regularly tested (current pH average 5.92). Over the past three years more land has gradually come into the arable rotation which is based around 100 acres of winter wheat followed by spring barley followed by oats. Straw is chopped and ploughed back in along with approximately 900-1000 tonnes of manure from neighbouring stock units on an annual basis. Historically potatoes have been grown at Mains of Rhynie and some land is considered to be suitable for carrot production.

Average yields are recorded as:
Winter Wheat 3.50 tonnes/acre;
Spring Barley 2.45 tonnes/acre;
Spring Oats 2.8 tonnes/acre.

Grass is currently let on a seasonal basis for silage/hay and for overwintering (sheep only). The farm is particularly well fenced with all fields benefitting from Rylock.

The 2017 cropping plan is as follows:

Winter Wheat 100 acres
Spring Barley 200 acres
Spring Oats   60 acres
Grass 100 acres

Wind Turbine Sites
Full planning permission was granted by Aberdeenshire Council (Ref: APP/2010/3029) on 1st April 2011 for the erection of three 25 m high 15kW wind turbines and meter house in field 34. The base foundations for each of the three turbines are in place with the grid connection in the meter house.

Further interest has been expressed by an energy company in respect of another site on the farm. Further details are available from the selling agents.

Potential Development Sites
The remains of a former dwelling lie within the wooded grounds to the north of the current farmhouse. Evidence of a former building exists adjacent to the driveway and may, subject to obtaining the necessary planning consents, be a suitable site for a dwelling.

Mains of Rhynie is being offered for sale as a whole or in two lots.

Lot 1 Mains of Rhynie Farm 496 acres Offers over £2.45 million

Lot 2 Mains of Rhynie Quarry 32 acres Offers over £150,000

Acreage: 496 Acres

Directions

From Aberdeen, take the A96 through Inverurie then follow the B9002 to Insch and continue until the A97. Turn left and follow A97 through the village of Rhynie. The entrance to Mains of Rhynie is on the right after one mile.

Alternatively, from Aberdeen, follow the A944 through Alford turning right onto the A97 at Mossatt. Continue until the farm entrance on the left one mile before the village of Rhynie.

The postcode is AB54 4HX.

Date posted: 10/08/17