Dairy Crest farmer blockade©Tim Scrivener

The decision by a group of farmers to stage a rolling-road protest on Friday lunchtime (24 July) sparked debate over whether such action is the right approach.

The ongoing protests in France have also had producers discussing whether direct action should play a bigger part in UK farmers’ tactics when it comes to the fight against low prices.

Social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter have seen farmers air views both for and against protests.

See also: Angry British farmers stage rolling tractor protest 

Some believe that British farmers have sat back for too long and supermarkets, processors and government need to realise how serious the situation has become.

What do you think?

Farmers Weekly wants to hear the views of farmers from all sectors.

To make it easy, you can fill in the short survey form here.

Alternatively, you can email philip.case@rbi.co.uk with your views.

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We want to know:

  • Would you support farmer protests in the UK?
  • If yes – why?
  • If no – what are your concerns?
  • Would you actually take part in a protest?
  • What would you hope they can achieve?
  • Who should any protests be aimed at?

Writing on Facebook, Surrey beef and sheep farmer Karen Telling said it was about time farmers took action.

“British farmers have sat back too long while the corporate entities trample all over us in the name of profit.

“Time to make a stand. If everyone stood together, surely it would make a difference?

“No one’s asking for massive profits, just enough to reinvest in our farms and livestock to keep farming and providing a nation with food.

“The government needs to wake up before it’s too late.”

But other producers fear the PR implications of British farmers taking to the streets and question what will be achieved.

Several have said they would prefer to see people spreading a positive message about farming.

In a statement the NFU said it understood dairy farmers across the UK were struggling after months of milk price cuts.

But it added: “We know that there’s no respite in the short term, but taking direct action in this way is not going to help overcome current market issues.

“Instead we’re working with FFA and TFA to identify and publicise bad practice in the supply chain, increase consumer support for British dairy and provide short term support to those that need it.”