Used buyer’s guide: John Deere 8200

Expert’s verdict

Bomb-proof – 8000-series Deeres are the most sought-after tractor in this power segment selling both here and going for export. Bill Pepper, Cheffins





In a lot of people’s eyes John Deere’s mid-1990s flagship 8000-series tractors had everything right – a big throaty power-plant, simple but smooth 16F x 4R powershift gearbox, electronically-controlled hydraulics and a well-balanced layout.


Designed and built with the North American prairie farmer in mind, many of the essential mechanical components are easily accessed and farm-fixable – and that alone makes them incredibly popular machines second-hand.


Little tends to go wrong with these solid powerhouses. But there are a few key things to look out for.



Kingpins: Not designed to carry wide rubber or dual wheels, the front-axle kingpins could wear prematurely. Jack the front axle up from the centre and, as you lower it, look out for the hub-carriers and wheels leaning over as they start to take the weight.


Water pump: As with many engines, the coolant pump eventually gives out. The beauty of the Deere is that any fault is easy to diagnose and repair. A tell-tale hole in the side of the housing gives away any seepage and changeover takes just over an hour.


Transmission: Run the tractor up the road and get it hot. Then notch all the way up and down through the 16 powershift steps to check for any particularly jerky or lazy gear changes. This will generally require dealer recalibration and, if there is significant delay, that will indicate clutch-pack slippage. Expect a 30-hour gearbox rebuild.




1996 John Deere 8200



  • 202hp
  • 7,000 hours
  • Condition: Good
  • £18,400



  •  John Deere 8200
  •  John Deere 8200
  •  John Deere 8200


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