Northern Ireland farm fire kills 6,000 chickens

About 6,000 chickens have been killed after a huge fire ripped through a farm shed in Northern Ireland.

Firefighters were called to the blaze at 10.37pm on Sunday (13 September) at the farm on Crosscavanagh Road in Dungannon, County Tyrone.

Eight appliances from Northern Ireland Fire & Rescue Service (NIFRS) battled to stop the fire from spreading to other buildings and had it under control by about 2.30am on Monday morning.

See also: Why on-farm water supply is critical to contain fires

NIFRS said it believed the cause of the fire was accidental ignition.

A spokesperson said: “Firefighters worked hard in challenging conditions to prevent the fire spreading and used three jets to extinguish the blaze.

“Approximately 6,000 chickens were killed in the incident.”

Appliances from fire stations in Dungannon, Pomeroy, Cookstown, Portadown, Lisburn and Dungiven were sent, including an aerial appliance.

NFU Mutual farm fire checklist

  • Fire prevention: Ensure there are sufficient fire extinguishers for the size of buildings, and that materials stored are inspected and regularly maintained
  • Ensure staff and adult family members know the location of fire extinguishers and how to use them
  • Reduce arson risk by fencing off straw stacks and farm buildings
  • Store hay and straw at least 10m from other buildings
  • Have an evacuation plan for staff and livestock
  • Store petrol, diesel and other fuels in secure areas
  • Schedule regular electrical safety checks
  • Invite your local fire and rescue service to visit to check water supplies and access routes
  • If a fire breaks out, call the fire and rescue service without delay
  • If possible, send someone to the farm entrance to direct the fire and rescue service to the fire to help save time
  • Prepare to evacuate livestock should the fire spread
  • Prepare to use farm machinery to help fire and rescue service
  • Use the What3Words app to guide emergency services to the exact location of the fire

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